July 11, 2022

Favorite Podcasts, Best Hosts, and Tricks of the Trade, with Timmy Bauer


In today's episode, Benji is joined by Timmy Bauer, Founder of Dinosaur House and host of The Literacy Advocate Podcast.  

We're breaking our regular format to discuss our favorite shows right now, the podcast hosts we learn from, and we're giving away some helpful hosting tips. 

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:00.120 --> 00:00:06.280 Hey Mike Club community, Benji here and excited to share with you today a 2 00:00:06.360 --> 00:00:11.519 curveball, a changeup of an episode. I sat down with Timmy Bauer and 3 00:00:11.919 --> 00:00:17.480 he is the founder of Dinosaur House and used to be a host of B 4 00:00:17.559 --> 00:00:22.160 Two b growth and work at sweet fish, but just a great podcaster and 5 00:00:22.280 --> 00:00:25.600 uh, he's in the Mike Club community. Thought why don't we chop it 6 00:00:25.719 --> 00:00:29.239 up, talk about our favorite shows, our favorite hosts, some tips and 7 00:00:29.280 --> 00:00:34.560 give that away in a conversation? And I'm on vacation, so what a 8 00:00:34.560 --> 00:00:39.600 better time than to just release this right now and put something in your feed 9 00:00:39.640 --> 00:00:44.240 this week that will make you a better B two B podcast host. I 10 00:00:44.280 --> 00:00:48.200 hope you enjoyed this conversation. It's a wide ranging one, but one that 11 00:00:48.280 --> 00:00:54.359 has tons of gold in it, and Timmy's fantastic to have on the podcast. 12 00:00:54.399 --> 00:01:07.680 So enjoy this conversation and we'll be back next week with another episode. 13 00:01:07.519 --> 00:01:12.079 Welcome back to my club, everybody. Benji here and excited today to have 14 00:01:12.200 --> 00:01:19.000 timmy with me. Timmy, you are a legend around sweet fish and so 15 00:01:19.359 --> 00:01:25.640 I I walk in you. I don't know about that. Well, you're 16 00:01:25.680 --> 00:01:30.799 infamous or famous or something. Tell me a little bit about your podcasting journey 17 00:01:30.799 --> 00:01:34.159 here off the top, so that our audience is aware of who you are 18 00:01:34.239 --> 00:01:37.959 and and maybe they have seen you, I guess, in the Linkedin Group. 19 00:01:38.000 --> 00:01:41.560 But tell us about about you. Okay, sure things. So, 20 00:01:41.840 --> 00:01:48.159 Um, I started podcasting something like four or five years ago because I know 21 00:01:48.280 --> 00:01:52.159 James Carberry and if you know James Carberry for long enough, eventually you're going 22 00:01:52.200 --> 00:01:55.920 to have a podcast. So, Um, I was trying to figure out 23 00:01:56.040 --> 00:01:59.040 this. This is like how I met James. Basically, I was we 24 00:01:59.040 --> 00:02:01.560 were going to the same church and somebody was like, if you trying to 25 00:02:01.560 --> 00:02:05.680 do anything entrepreneurial, you gotta Talk to James Carberry. I was like, 26 00:02:05.719 --> 00:02:07.080 okay, sure thing, I'm gonna go talk to him. And at the 27 00:02:07.159 --> 00:02:10.960 time I had just made my first children's book, Billy the Dragon, like 28 00:02:12.039 --> 00:02:15.719 I had just gotten it printed and because I made it for my little brother, 29 00:02:16.319 --> 00:02:22.360 I have always wanted to be a professional story artist. Uh realized I 30 00:02:22.360 --> 00:02:24.240 wanted to be a kid's book author after I Made Billy the dragon for my 31 00:02:24.240 --> 00:02:28.560 little brother and had no idea how to do it. I just knew that 32 00:02:28.599 --> 00:02:31.800 I wanted to go the entrepreneurial route instead of the hoping and praying that a 33 00:02:31.800 --> 00:02:36.879 publisher takes me up route. So to go talk to James, and James 34 00:02:37.000 --> 00:02:38.759 is like, Bro, you have the product in your hands right now, 35 00:02:38.840 --> 00:02:43.400 you just need to knock on the doors of your customers. So I did 36 00:02:43.439 --> 00:02:46.599 that for a while. I was literally knocking on elementary school doors and getting 37 00:02:46.840 --> 00:02:52.840 school visits where I could perform and sell my kids books. And just like, 38 00:02:53.639 --> 00:02:57.039 around this time, James hadn't yet started sweet fish, but he started 39 00:02:57.080 --> 00:03:00.199 a show called he started a show for churches and then he started at a 40 00:03:00.240 --> 00:03:04.280 show called inspiring awesome, where he just interviewed people. that he thought was 41 00:03:04.319 --> 00:03:07.560 awesome. Great premise for a show if you're doing content based networking, which 42 00:03:07.560 --> 00:03:09.919 is a book that he would go on to write. I'm jumping around a 43 00:03:09.960 --> 00:03:14.840 little bit, but everything's relevant. So I just remember the feeling of being 44 00:03:14.879 --> 00:03:16.360 like I had just met this guy named James. He gave me some really 45 00:03:16.360 --> 00:03:20.800 good advice. He's pushing me to be successful as a touring kids book author 46 00:03:21.280 --> 00:03:23.080 and he's got this podcast inspiring awesome, and I remember thinking, man, 47 00:03:23.120 --> 00:03:27.840 I really want to be a guest on inspiring awesome, even though I had 48 00:03:27.879 --> 00:03:30.800 no thought of like does this show have any audience that none of that's even 49 00:03:30.840 --> 00:03:35.479 in my head. and Um, and sure enough, James asked me to 50 00:03:35.520 --> 00:03:38.360 go on his show and I'm like, I'm so nervous I'm sweating. This 51 00:03:38.400 --> 00:03:42.240 is the first time I've ever done any sort of like public speaking, aside 52 00:03:42.280 --> 00:03:46.199 from getting up in front of kids to perform. And Uh and James Interviews 53 00:03:46.240 --> 00:03:50.520 me and, uh, this has nothing to do with the story, but 54 00:03:50.560 --> 00:03:54.479 I think it's hilarious. He never posted the episode because he stopped doing the 55 00:03:54.520 --> 00:04:00.120 show. Uh, and was like launching sweet fish. And I thought, 56 00:04:00.159 --> 00:04:01.840 I thought that I was the reason, like I thought that I just like 57 00:04:01.960 --> 00:04:08.240 my interview sucks so bad. Oh, UM, okay, but how do 58 00:04:08.319 --> 00:04:12.599 how does this relate to me starting a podcast? Um, I was looking 59 00:04:12.680 --> 00:04:18.519 for like how can I consistently uh connect with, Um, the people in 60 00:04:18.560 --> 00:04:24.560 the publishing industry so that I can try to be a successful Kid's book author? 61 00:04:25.160 --> 00:04:29.759 and Um, and James was like, you need to start a podcast 62 00:04:30.319 --> 00:04:33.439 that's all about you connecting with people in the kid's book space. So I 63 00:04:33.439 --> 00:04:36.639 did. My first show was called books for kids, and all I did 64 00:04:36.720 --> 00:04:42.839 was connect with anybody who worked in, UH, the Children's book or Kid 65 00:04:42.959 --> 00:04:47.439 Literacy. Kid Literature Space. I was interviewing teachers, I was interviewing parents, 66 00:04:47.439 --> 00:04:51.160 I was interviewing famous kids book authors. It was so cool to think 67 00:04:51.199 --> 00:04:58.600 like I could interview a famous kids book author just because I've got this microphone 68 00:04:58.639 --> 00:05:02.160 connected to my computer. Um. And this was I think this was still 69 00:05:02.240 --> 00:05:06.199 before James wrote content based networking, but it was. It was after he 70 00:05:06.240 --> 00:05:10.800 had come up with the concept. Um. So, for anyone who's WHO's 71 00:05:10.959 --> 00:05:14.920 unfamiliar, content based networking is the idea that you can connect with just about 72 00:05:14.920 --> 00:05:17.879 anybody if the if the thing that you're asking is, Hey, let's do 73 00:05:17.920 --> 00:05:23.319 some content together. So, Um. So I was using content based networking 74 00:05:23.360 --> 00:05:28.959 for that and it took me a little while to realize that connecting with other 75 00:05:29.079 --> 00:05:31.680 kids book authors isn't going to make me a successful Kid's book author. It's 76 00:05:31.759 --> 00:05:35.600 great for relationship building with people that are in the industry, but it's not 77 00:05:35.639 --> 00:05:41.040 going to lead to me necessary. Like it would be a really roundabout path 78 00:05:41.319 --> 00:05:45.600 to go from that too. I'm speaking on stages as a kid's book author, 79 00:05:46.399 --> 00:05:51.639 the Surefire Path was interview the people who have access to those stages and 80 00:05:51.720 --> 00:05:56.839 it took me way too long to make that connection. Um, but as 81 00:05:56.879 --> 00:05:59.720 soon as I did. That kind of changed everything. So I changed my 82 00:06:00.000 --> 00:06:04.639 own name to the literacy advocate and focused on interviewing people that had access to 83 00:06:05.360 --> 00:06:11.480 stages, whether it's literally like stages in a media center at a school or 84 00:06:11.680 --> 00:06:15.800 stages at a conference for teachers, where I could use that to book tours 85 00:06:15.839 --> 00:06:20.680 off of. And so that was my first step into the kind of content 86 00:06:20.759 --> 00:06:26.920 based networking that drives business results, because I was using the literacy advocate to 87 00:06:27.000 --> 00:06:30.680 connect with the people that I would that that I could then that that were 88 00:06:30.720 --> 00:06:35.759 then willingly helping me build tours, and the tours was earning me money as 89 00:06:35.759 --> 00:06:41.839 a traveling kids book author, and relationships were strong enough, they're like to 90 00:06:41.839 --> 00:06:46.399 where you actually can say, man, that's really drove business results. Yeah, 91 00:06:46.439 --> 00:06:48.639 I mean I would get done doing a podcast interview and they'd be like 92 00:06:48.680 --> 00:06:51.439 wait, so you'RE A kid's book author, and then we'd start talking about 93 00:06:51.439 --> 00:06:55.399 it and I'd be like yeah, I tour for free because I make all 94 00:06:55.439 --> 00:06:58.839 my money in book sales. Like would you ever want to help me, 95 00:06:58.920 --> 00:07:03.319 like, come visit your school schools that you're connected with, and I was 96 00:07:03.360 --> 00:07:09.079 able to book tours that way. Wow, I love that as the backdrop 97 00:07:09.319 --> 00:07:13.879 and I love hearing other podcasters just their journey and even I mean, I 98 00:07:13.920 --> 00:07:16.800 think the common mistake that you just mentioned is it happens all the time. 99 00:07:16.879 --> 00:07:19.519 People get into content and they're like, Oh, you can meet all these 100 00:07:19.560 --> 00:07:24.839 fascinating people and you're interested in people that are exactly like you, but that 101 00:07:24.920 --> 00:07:29.480 means they might not be the decision maker per se. In some situations are, 102 00:07:29.519 --> 00:07:30.920 but not the decisions. A lot of times it's not. Yes, 103 00:07:31.160 --> 00:07:36.120 exactly. So that's really, really interesting. Well, for our listeners here 104 00:07:36.319 --> 00:07:39.720 you're you're listening into Timmy story and you're like, okay, this is a 105 00:07:39.759 --> 00:07:44.879 way different Mike Club episode, and that's exactly right. We're here, uh, 106 00:07:45.240 --> 00:07:49.959 chatting about podcasting because I I'm on vacation, so we wanted to release 107 00:07:49.959 --> 00:07:55.040 something just really wild and different. And so, Timmy, what I want 108 00:07:55.040 --> 00:07:58.120 to do is, instead of going what's in the news of podcasting, let's 109 00:07:58.120 --> 00:08:01.040 actually talk through some some of our favorite podcast right now, what those things 110 00:08:01.079 --> 00:08:05.639 are teaching us. And Uh, I think that'd be really helpful. I 111 00:08:05.639 --> 00:08:09.600 always love hearing what a podcaster where they draw their inspiration, and so I 112 00:08:09.639 --> 00:08:13.839 want to I want to hear that from from you, and I created a 113 00:08:13.839 --> 00:08:16.399 listener myself too, so we can even bounce off of each other a little 114 00:08:16.399 --> 00:08:20.360 bit. But I want to go three favorite podcasts that you have right now. 115 00:08:20.920 --> 00:08:22.240 Why don't you do one, then I'll do one and we'll just kind 116 00:08:22.240 --> 00:08:26.399 of paying back and forth. But what's what's one of your favorite podcasts right 117 00:08:26.439 --> 00:08:28.879 now? So my answers are going to be really weird, I think. 118 00:08:30.279 --> 00:08:35.279 But one of my favorite shows is it's literally called the Charlie and Ben podcast. 119 00:08:35.960 --> 00:08:37.960 Terrible name for a podcast, I guess, unless you just don't care. 120 00:08:39.519 --> 00:08:43.919 Um, they're the duo behind a very popular youtube channel called charisma in 121 00:08:43.919 --> 00:08:48.639 command. That's how I got into them. Charisma in command is like a 122 00:08:48.879 --> 00:08:52.240 great resource if you're trying to become a better podcast host. Um. So 123 00:08:52.519 --> 00:08:56.399 I was just digging there I was. I was watching every single charisma command 124 00:08:56.480 --> 00:09:01.159 video. Uh, and then a chilly started listening to their podcast, and 125 00:09:01.240 --> 00:09:07.799 they talk about everything from how they started their business too, uh, what's 126 00:09:07.840 --> 00:09:11.799 going on in politics. Like it's just a weird show, but I'm a 127 00:09:11.799 --> 00:09:16.399 big fan of these two guys and, Um, I think they're really thoughtful 128 00:09:16.480 --> 00:09:18.519 in the way that they think about stuff. So that's why I'm that's why 129 00:09:18.559 --> 00:09:24.440 I'm into them and their content isn't the same podcasts of videos that you'd find 130 00:09:24.440 --> 00:09:30.639 on Youtube. UH, yeah, it's it's they yeah, I mean they're 131 00:09:30.679 --> 00:09:33.480 doing the play they're doing like the Joe Rogan playbook, I think, where 132 00:09:33.480 --> 00:09:35.559 it's like they do an hour long they do an hour long podcast, they 133 00:09:35.559 --> 00:09:39.840 break it into like six clips, they post the clips throughout the week, 134 00:09:39.440 --> 00:09:43.879 Um, and the podcast is like super topical. So they're just like taking 135 00:09:43.919 --> 00:09:48.879 topics nice cool. The first one for me is the Bill Simmons podcast, 136 00:09:48.879 --> 00:09:52.200 which he's like in the sports world, the ringer. A lot of you 137 00:09:52.200 --> 00:09:56.960 will know the ringer podcast network, and it's funny because this is also not 138 00:09:56.039 --> 00:10:00.519 like a business example, by any means, although he has made a business 139 00:10:00.559 --> 00:10:05.639 of his podcast network. But to me, watching how someone hosts and the 140 00:10:05.720 --> 00:10:13.639 back and forth between him and his guests, if you're listening two, try 141 00:10:13.679 --> 00:10:18.639 to figure out the way he comes up with his questions. It is mind 142 00:10:18.679 --> 00:10:20.919 blowing. It's like, okay, you are taking a topic that someone would 143 00:10:20.960 --> 00:10:24.960 cover from one angle and you're covering it from a completely different angle and then 144 00:10:24.960 --> 00:10:28.679 you got like fifteen follow up questions that most people aren't asking or you're making 145 00:10:28.759 --> 00:10:31.879 a game out of this on the spot, just by the way your brain 146 00:10:31.000 --> 00:10:35.039 is working. And so I listened to to the Bill Simmons podcast just with 147 00:10:35.080 --> 00:10:39.759 a lot of intentionality going. I don't know how necessarily to bring it into 148 00:10:39.840 --> 00:10:43.559 business, but it does make me hyper more relational in the way that I 149 00:10:43.600 --> 00:10:46.840 talked to two guests that I have on B two B growth or when I'm 150 00:10:46.840 --> 00:10:50.840 co hosting my club. So that's my my first suggestion. Throw it back 151 00:10:50.840 --> 00:10:56.559 to what's another one to say. So this is the complete opposite extreme, 152 00:10:56.799 --> 00:11:01.759 but I like listening to the lex free been podcast. I don't know if 153 00:11:01.759 --> 00:11:05.200 you've listened to any of those episodes. The reason I like and so I 154 00:11:05.559 --> 00:11:11.840 listed him as one of my favorite hosts, Um and the reason is counterintuitive. 155 00:11:11.200 --> 00:11:16.120 He has, you, some would argue he has no charisma, like 156 00:11:16.240 --> 00:11:24.279 he's he talks in a monotone voice, Super Deadpan, very little laughs or 157 00:11:24.320 --> 00:11:28.480 like like banter with the with the guest. That's often the way he goes. 158 00:11:28.720 --> 00:11:35.000 He seems a little socially awkward. But yet somehow he's been able to 159 00:11:35.039 --> 00:11:39.279 make this massive podcast, uh, and make these really interesting to listen to. 160 00:11:39.639 --> 00:11:45.559 You know, sometimes three hour long episodes and it must be the way 161 00:11:45.600 --> 00:11:48.840 that he is able to pull insights out of his guests and the way that 162 00:11:48.840 --> 00:11:52.080 he's able to ask questions. That has to be the reason, because he's 163 00:11:52.159 --> 00:11:56.559 he would be too boring to listen to otherwise. So yeah, I got 164 00:11:56.600 --> 00:12:01.399 charismon command over here to have cur SMA and then it's like, well then 165 00:12:01.399 --> 00:12:03.879 there's this guy who maybe you would argue has no charisma and yet he's made 166 00:12:03.879 --> 00:12:09.159 an extremely successful show, probably because of the way he asked questions. The 167 00:12:09.240 --> 00:12:13.440 way you ask questions is key, and that knowing yourself, man, that's 168 00:12:13.440 --> 00:12:16.480 something I've been learning a lot in podcasting. The more more you know yourself 169 00:12:18.000 --> 00:12:20.399 and our in tune with like how am I best showing up in this conversation, 170 00:12:20.519 --> 00:12:26.120 not trying to show up like somebody else. That shines through in a 171 00:12:26.240 --> 00:12:31.039 very different way in podcasting. Ah, it doesn't feel forced. Almost I 172 00:12:31.039 --> 00:12:33.559 don't know if that's how you would describe your experience, but that to me 173 00:12:33.639 --> 00:12:39.159 that that is a key point in podcasting is leaning into you not trying to 174 00:12:39.240 --> 00:12:43.879 be what you think people want. Yeah, well, I mean that's a 175 00:12:43.919 --> 00:12:46.679 tough question. Well, I don't know. When you're three on the Asiagram, 176 00:12:46.720 --> 00:12:50.080 you're just always worried about like it does. Do People like me? 177 00:12:50.159 --> 00:12:54.320 Do People like to me that I am so? So I don't know how 178 00:12:54.360 --> 00:13:00.639 helpful that really is for me. It's just such an interesting balance, because 179 00:13:00.639 --> 00:13:05.200 I do think the mirroring is great to a point, but especially as you 180 00:13:05.240 --> 00:13:09.200 try to drive home your point of view, and I can say this as 181 00:13:09.200 --> 00:13:15.240 a fellow angiogram three like that the more you figure out who you are, 182 00:13:16.399 --> 00:13:20.919 the more beneficial I think it is to the kind of the content you create, 183 00:13:20.480 --> 00:13:24.279 because then you're not always shifting depending on the people that you're talking to. 184 00:13:24.679 --> 00:13:28.440 And so that to me, like if you don't have that level of 185 00:13:28.600 --> 00:13:33.000 energy but you're always trying to match someone else's level of energy, it's gonna 186 00:13:33.039 --> 00:13:35.240 make for a really weird show. You should try to get better, but 187 00:13:35.320 --> 00:13:39.600 you shouldn't try to be someone else. Yeah, that's something I've talked about 188 00:13:39.600 --> 00:13:45.679 with Dan as well, Dan Sanchez, because he he has this belief that, 189 00:13:46.080 --> 00:13:48.039 you know, your personality is something that you can kind of like lift 190 00:13:48.080 --> 00:13:52.519 the hood on and like make all these adjustments too, and you shouldn't. 191 00:13:52.639 --> 00:13:56.360 You shouldn't have the mindset of like just be yourself, because you can fundamentally 192 00:13:56.440 --> 00:14:01.639 change your personality to be better. And that's a little more extreme than I'm 193 00:14:01.639 --> 00:14:07.720 willing to go, but I agree that you should you should not treat your 194 00:14:07.720 --> 00:14:11.399 personality like it's a fixed thing, while at the same time you have to 195 00:14:11.440 --> 00:14:15.159 find the stuff that you can do that will actually work for who you are. 196 00:14:15.240 --> 00:14:18.320 Like when I go to the doctor and the doctor is trying to give 197 00:14:18.320 --> 00:14:22.639 me health advice, my wife will get upset with me because I'll push back 198 00:14:22.639 --> 00:14:26.279 on the doctor so much, and the reason is I say to the doctor, 199 00:14:26.320 --> 00:14:28.840 I'm like, look, we can't leave this office until we come up 200 00:14:28.840 --> 00:14:33.360 with something that I'm going to do that I will actually do. There is 201 00:14:33.440 --> 00:14:35.519 no value and you're telling me to do something that I won't that I know 202 00:14:35.600 --> 00:14:39.240 I won't actually do. So, like there's got to be this balance of 203 00:14:39.279 --> 00:14:45.039 like trying to evolve and become better, but but, but maintaining like these 204 00:14:45.039 --> 00:14:48.200 are these are habits that I can form because I know that I will actually 205 00:14:48.240 --> 00:14:52.080 do them. Yep, as much as I try, I won't ever be 206 00:14:52.279 --> 00:14:56.000 a fully analytical brain, and that's what Dan is really great at. So 207 00:14:56.120 --> 00:14:58.559 it actually allows us to lean on each other. And so to me it's 208 00:14:58.559 --> 00:15:03.159 like, yeah, you should get better at that side, but also if 209 00:15:03.200 --> 00:15:07.440 I'm heavier into the relation, relational side and can bring a lot of energy 210 00:15:07.480 --> 00:15:11.600 in a different way. That's uniquely me thing that I feel like there is 211 00:15:11.639 --> 00:15:13.519 some wiring there, there is some nature there, so it's a it's a 212 00:15:13.559 --> 00:15:18.559 fascinating conversation, but I love that you brought the polar opposite examples. My 213 00:15:18.679 --> 00:15:24.200 second example is more from the religious space, but it's called the Holy Post 214 00:15:24.240 --> 00:15:28.200 podcast and the reason I love this show is they always have two parts. 215 00:15:28.200 --> 00:15:31.320 So the first part is banter between two guys who have known each other and 216 00:15:31.360 --> 00:15:35.759 then usually they bring in a girl. She's there's two girls, so they'll 217 00:15:35.759 --> 00:15:39.000 like switch off every other episode. The front half they're taking on like some 218 00:15:39.039 --> 00:15:46.480 of the hotter topics, the things that they're just seeing from around spirituality church, 219 00:15:46.759 --> 00:15:48.279 and then the back half is the interview. A lot of times I 220 00:15:48.360 --> 00:15:52.879 skip the interview and I only listen to the first half. It's because they 221 00:15:52.919 --> 00:16:00.360 know each other well enough that it's and their depth of knowledge and history is 222 00:16:00.559 --> 00:16:04.279 so great that they can co host a show together in a very unique way. 223 00:16:04.480 --> 00:16:11.000 So don't think interview, Think Banter back and forth and I love watching 224 00:16:11.039 --> 00:16:17.559 how, in a recording setting you can still facilitate conversation well and like interrupt 225 00:16:17.559 --> 00:16:19.679 each other and have a good back and forth and like, Oh, I 226 00:16:19.720 --> 00:16:25.440 don't know if I think that way. So the Holy Post podcast for banter 227 00:16:25.639 --> 00:16:29.879 purposes has been really helpful to me and and is one of my favorite favorite 228 00:16:29.879 --> 00:16:36.360 podcasts right now. The thing about banter is, and I probably lean too 229 00:16:36.399 --> 00:16:40.960 far this direction, but I'm pretty outspoken about this Um in a pot. 230 00:16:40.960 --> 00:16:45.720 This is not true about, for Charismas Sake, having good conversation, but 231 00:16:45.799 --> 00:16:49.080 this is true for podcasting. In my opinion, whoever is having the AHA 232 00:16:49.200 --> 00:16:53.759 moment should get to interrupt. So if you're talking and it's triggering some big 233 00:16:53.799 --> 00:16:56.679 thought in my brain, I should just get to talk right over you and 234 00:16:56.759 --> 00:17:03.600 say it, because because that snippet of me fired up being like, oh 235 00:17:03.600 --> 00:17:07.039 my gosh, yeah, it's like this, like everybody thinks this thing, 236 00:17:07.039 --> 00:17:08.960 but the reality is DA, DA, Dadada, like that's a clip that 237 00:17:08.960 --> 00:17:14.000 you're gonna want to use and if if so, so, so we should. 238 00:17:14.200 --> 00:17:17.799 So you should be encouraging that in the setting of a podcast, which 239 00:17:17.839 --> 00:17:21.319 is why I tell all my guests to put headphones on so that they can 240 00:17:21.400 --> 00:17:23.240 hear if I'm interrupting them and I wear headphones so I can hear if they're 241 00:17:23.240 --> 00:17:27.200 interrupting me. Um. I've said that on on Dan's other podcast too. 242 00:17:27.480 --> 00:17:30.640 I think I probably take it too far. I'm a natural interrupter, so 243 00:17:32.359 --> 00:17:36.720 I probably actually need to do less interrupting. It's always a balance to strike. 244 00:17:37.319 --> 00:17:41.920 Okay, give me your your third and final favorite podcast right now. 245 00:17:41.920 --> 00:17:47.319 It's B two B growth, because I feel like I feel like B Two 246 00:17:47.319 --> 00:17:52.599 b growth is the place where I think I developed the most as a host. 247 00:17:52.359 --> 00:17:57.200 Um, just learning from James and Logan, uh, and then and 248 00:17:57.240 --> 00:18:02.240 then eventually becoming a host to be two be growth and developing the whole P 249 00:18:02.319 --> 00:18:06.680 O v. What? Why? How? Thing. Uh. It's also 250 00:18:06.960 --> 00:18:11.960 I was doing content based networking, uh, with much higher stakes. So, 251 00:18:12.920 --> 00:18:17.240 Um, I think B two B growth is a great place to learn 252 00:18:17.279 --> 00:18:21.480 how to host, if you're if that's what you're interested in, a great 253 00:18:21.480 --> 00:18:23.200 way to a great way to learn how, like you can listen to episodes 254 00:18:23.240 --> 00:18:26.920 and learn. Oh, that's a great way to shine the spotlight on somebody 255 00:18:26.920 --> 00:18:30.279 else, especially when you know that, like, one of the things that 256 00:18:30.319 --> 00:18:33.200 B two be growth doing is doing, is content based networking. You can 257 00:18:33.200 --> 00:18:36.559 go okay, there is a way to get good content and do content based 258 00:18:36.559 --> 00:18:38.640 networking at the same time. It's B two B growth. MM HMM. 259 00:18:40.359 --> 00:18:44.279 Yeah, it's been a fun balance to try to strike there and I'm excited 260 00:18:44.319 --> 00:18:48.000 too, because we're in like the evolution process yet again and like what the 261 00:18:48.000 --> 00:18:51.160 show will be and what it will look like moving forward. But there is 262 00:18:51.200 --> 00:18:53.519 I'm a firm believer in what you said there, that there is a balance 263 00:18:53.599 --> 00:18:57.160 to be struck between, okay, I want to get to know this person 264 00:18:57.200 --> 00:19:00.880 and I think that like we have service is that we could offer that, 265 00:19:00.920 --> 00:19:03.000 you know, this relationship could be mutually beneficial. But then there's also like 266 00:19:03.640 --> 00:19:07.000 you also have a wealth of knowledge that I want to tap into as a 267 00:19:07.039 --> 00:19:11.279 host. That will make for interesting content if I can pull it out in 268 00:19:11.319 --> 00:19:12.839 the right way. And it's fun to talk to people who aren't really in 269 00:19:12.880 --> 00:19:18.440 the podcasting space because it's an interesting challenge, uh, to get the content 270 00:19:18.480 --> 00:19:22.799 and drive home one kind of main point. So B Two B growth is 271 00:19:22.799 --> 00:19:25.400 a fun one, uh. And also, you know what? I had 272 00:19:25.440 --> 00:19:27.079 other ones written down, but I'll say because we've both been hosts of B 273 00:19:27.160 --> 00:19:32.200 two B growth, like why not just end on that one? Like that's 274 00:19:32.200 --> 00:19:37.000 such a fun way to to end that section. Okay, so with that, 275 00:19:37.319 --> 00:19:40.720 you alluded to something earlier. I wanted to hit on who's your favorite 276 00:19:40.720 --> 00:19:45.119 podcast host right now and like what's just give me like a lesson that you've 277 00:19:45.200 --> 00:19:47.880 learned or gleaned from them. I know we've talked about that a little bit 278 00:19:47.880 --> 00:19:52.160 in favorite podcast, but as a host, who stands out? Very few 279 00:19:52.160 --> 00:19:56.720 people host well, in my opinion. Uh, and so I listened to 280 00:19:56.720 --> 00:20:00.359 a lot of podcasts where, and maybe it's because I've been on the inside 281 00:20:00.359 --> 00:20:02.519 of it, and I'm like, that's not the question that I would have 282 00:20:02.559 --> 00:20:06.200 asked, like I want to know Da, Da, DA, like so. 283 00:20:06.200 --> 00:20:08.799 So I I often get frustrated with hosts when I listen to podcasts, 284 00:20:08.799 --> 00:20:14.039 but the reason I picked lex is because of his the way he asked questions. 285 00:20:14.480 --> 00:20:18.279 So, even though he's got even though he's completely flat, I think 286 00:20:18.319 --> 00:20:22.000 that he's he's doing something right when it comes to question asking, because he's 287 00:20:22.119 --> 00:20:29.759 making these super long interviews and he's got millions of subscribers. Yep, I 288 00:20:29.839 --> 00:20:33.880 think for me I was. I really mauled this one over, because a 289 00:20:33.920 --> 00:20:38.359 lot of the people that I admire are more in like radio space or sports 290 00:20:38.359 --> 00:20:42.559 space, which just speaks to maybe the type of stuff that I I'm fascinated 291 00:20:42.559 --> 00:20:47.519 by when you can talk on a topic like that. But the one that 292 00:20:47.599 --> 00:20:51.279 stuck out to me recently, and it's more because of actually his micro clips 293 00:20:51.279 --> 00:20:56.400 and his micro content on instagram and Tiktok, is Lewis House and he does 294 00:20:56.720 --> 00:20:59.839 school of Greatness, and I've gone in and out of like being interested in 295 00:20:59.839 --> 00:21:03.319 that show, not interested in that show, but if you go back, 296 00:21:03.440 --> 00:21:06.720 because his show has been around for so long now, you can see him 297 00:21:06.759 --> 00:21:11.240 developing as okay, I'm I'm a host too. Oh, I've built something 298 00:21:11.279 --> 00:21:17.599 that's like people want my perspective, and that's a transition that's pretty hard if 299 00:21:17.599 --> 00:21:23.079 you're a primarily a question asker. Fantastic, like continue to own that and 300 00:21:23.079 --> 00:21:27.039 and hone that skill, but at the same time, if you've built an 301 00:21:27.039 --> 00:21:30.799 audience on a show, they also want to know your perspective on topics, 302 00:21:32.200 --> 00:21:36.000 and that's something that I have to continually get better at, especially because I 303 00:21:36.000 --> 00:21:38.920 was kind of late to the marketing game but had a podcast background, so 304 00:21:38.960 --> 00:21:42.039 I knew how to ask some questions, but I didn't necessarily have all the 305 00:21:42.400 --> 00:21:48.160 formed opinions and I think watching his transition from I ask quality questions too. 306 00:21:48.519 --> 00:21:52.240 Oh, you said that and I actually have an opinion on this. Not 307 00:21:52.279 --> 00:21:56.960 necessarily that's counter but it adds to the conversation. That's a different way of 308 00:21:57.000 --> 00:22:03.279 hosting. That is super were super valuable too. If you're newer to podcasting, 309 00:22:03.279 --> 00:22:06.119 and maybe that's new to you, like you're coming, to just shine 310 00:22:06.160 --> 00:22:11.960 the spotlight on your guest. Figuring out that great balance is, yeah, 311 00:22:11.279 --> 00:22:15.759 skill to develop. I think one of the things that you can do to 312 00:22:15.839 --> 00:22:19.440 start developing strong points of view yourself as a host so that you can start 313 00:22:19.440 --> 00:22:23.680 doing micro. You're probably already doing micro, that video micro or episodes where 314 00:22:23.680 --> 00:22:26.960 you're the solo host. That are awesome. But Um, just for anyone 315 00:22:27.000 --> 00:22:30.680 who's listening, like uh, start, start as the dumb person, like 316 00:22:30.839 --> 00:22:33.839 start with like I'm dumb and I'm just gonna Learn and I'M gonna learn from 317 00:22:33.839 --> 00:22:38.240 everybody that I talked to. But as you start to feel comfortable, start 318 00:22:38.799 --> 00:22:44.920 presenting the devil's advocate position of the p o vs of your guests. And 319 00:22:45.079 --> 00:22:47.640 it doesn't have to be your belief, but if you can figure out what 320 00:22:47.759 --> 00:22:52.440 the opposite belief is that and stated as strongly as possible and get your guests 321 00:22:52.480 --> 00:22:57.000 to have to answer challenges to their own beliefs. It will start developing your 322 00:22:57.039 --> 00:23:02.400 own points of view because you'll be pitting ideas against each other and you'll start 323 00:23:02.400 --> 00:23:07.160 to take on beliefs. That's good, all right. Let's end this episode 324 00:23:07.160 --> 00:23:11.519 to me with each of us giving one helpful tips, something we've learned from 325 00:23:11.559 --> 00:23:15.839 our time as podcast hosts. Let's each give one tip, and that's how 326 00:23:15.839 --> 00:23:18.759 we'll wrap this thing. You already have given away a lot of gold in 327 00:23:18.799 --> 00:23:22.640 this. It's been a super fun to have you. But if you could 328 00:23:22.680 --> 00:23:25.240 just give us one thing to walk away with, what would be your your 329 00:23:25.279 --> 00:23:30.079 thing you'd want to tell this room full of podcast hosts? Man One thing. 330 00:23:30.640 --> 00:23:33.640 Um, I was going to give three things. Well, if you 331 00:23:33.640 --> 00:23:37.359 can give them a quick I'll give you. I'll let you. I'll say 332 00:23:37.519 --> 00:23:40.440 I'll say this. If it's like I'm just starting out, I need training 333 00:23:40.440 --> 00:23:42.039 wheels, P O v Discovery and what? Why? How, if you 334 00:23:42.079 --> 00:23:45.839 don't know what that is like, sweet fish media dot com. Type in 335 00:23:45.920 --> 00:23:48.680 P O V or P O v Discovery. What? Why? How? 336 00:23:48.720 --> 00:23:52.480 I did a video where it's it's a templated thing that you can do where 337 00:23:52.480 --> 00:23:57.119 you can consistently deliver good episodes with almost no hosting skills. If you want 338 00:23:57.119 --> 00:24:02.960 to develop posting skills from the content based networking perspective of developing relationships with your 339 00:24:02.960 --> 00:24:07.559 guests, charisma in command, like just start getting into charisma in command content. 340 00:24:07.240 --> 00:24:11.920 And then, uh, from a content perspective, it's the whole like 341 00:24:12.039 --> 00:24:15.359 devil's advocate thing. Like, if you want to start developing better content, 342 00:24:15.440 --> 00:24:18.880 start figuring out what the devil's advocate position is of your guests. Yep, 343 00:24:19.680 --> 00:24:23.119 if you want to develop your P O v, one thing I would suggest 344 00:24:23.160 --> 00:24:26.319 too, is in your show notes write a story that you're going to tell 345 00:24:26.920 --> 00:24:32.000 so instead of like waiting for them, have it baked in. Here's the 346 00:24:32.039 --> 00:24:34.599 five questions I'm gonna ask and after question three, if I was answering it, 347 00:24:34.640 --> 00:24:37.720 I would say this story. So I'M gonna have it in my notes 348 00:24:37.720 --> 00:24:40.759 and I'm gonna share this story. When you bake it into your show notes, 349 00:24:40.880 --> 00:24:45.720 you are giving yourself permission to share your perspective and you have to get 350 00:24:45.759 --> 00:24:48.680 in that routine the same way you've got in your normal show routine. So 351 00:24:48.720 --> 00:24:51.759 that's a way to develop your p o v. and then the other thing 352 00:24:51.799 --> 00:24:55.880 is just I always do every episode with a Whiteboard next to me and I'm 353 00:24:56.000 --> 00:25:00.079 jotting down. That's my act of listening, participation right and being able to 354 00:25:00.200 --> 00:25:03.759 sum up what they just said and read it back to them or just say 355 00:25:03.799 --> 00:25:07.599 it back to them right. You're it's a great way to make you a 356 00:25:07.599 --> 00:25:11.039 better host. You're not doing anything except for mirroring and proving that you were 357 00:25:11.079 --> 00:25:15.480 actually listening, but it creates a flow in the conversation and sometimes you just 358 00:25:15.519 --> 00:25:18.039 say what they said right back to them, don't ask a question, and 359 00:25:18.079 --> 00:25:23.000 then they have more to say. So yes, yeah, that's really that. 360 00:25:23.079 --> 00:25:26.799 No, I agree. That's really good advice. Like when when you 361 00:25:26.839 --> 00:25:30.319 can, when you can say something and it's not a question and it forces 362 00:25:30.400 --> 00:25:33.599 the other person to expound more. Like that's really good. That's a really 363 00:25:33.640 --> 00:25:37.640 good hosting so uncomfortable at first, though. First few times you try that, 364 00:25:37.759 --> 00:25:42.000 you're like my hope they get what I'm doing here, but it's worth 365 00:25:42.039 --> 00:25:47.480 trying. Man, I love this, Timmy. We uh need to wrap 366 00:25:47.519 --> 00:25:52.039 it, but could talk to you about podcasting for a long time. Appreciate 367 00:25:52.079 --> 00:25:56.920 you jumping on Mike Club and to everyone listening. You know, if you 368 00:25:56.960 --> 00:25:59.319 ever have a question. If you ever want to connect with us the MIC 369 00:25:59.359 --> 00:26:02.680 club community, he is the place to do that over on Linkedin and I 370 00:26:02.920 --> 00:26:06.079 love to have a good back and forth and always want to continue to get 371 00:26:06.119 --> 00:26:08.359 better at the skill of podcasting. So thanks for listening to this episode, 372 00:26:08.359 --> 00:26:11.759 everybody. We'll be back next week with another one. Timmy, your a 373 00:26:11.799 --> 00:26:15.799 legend. Thank you for being here. Man, thanks, Benjie, you 374 00:26:15.839 --> 00:26:15.720 two, this is awesome.