Aug. 8, 2022

Upgrading Your Video Podcast, Utilize YouTube Shorts, and What to Post About Your Show on LinkedIn


In this episode, Benji and Walt discuss:

What we're listening to right now: 

Walt: Truth Be Told 

Benji: Will MacAskill of Effective Altruism Fame — The Value of Longtermism, Tools for Beating Stress and Overwhelm, AI Scenarios, High-Impact Books, and How to Save the World and Be an Agent of Change (#612) 

News:

1 Remote recording tool Riverside has launched a number of updates: using your iOS device as a second camera; mobile support for video recording up to 4K; and the Clubhouse-like Live Call-in comes to Android. (POD NEWS)

2 YouTube’s Added a New Option to Cut Your Long Form Videos into Shorts

3 What to Post on LinkedIn: The 5 Content Types That Work Best

Member Highlight:

Growth Marketing Camp

Q&A:

How detailed should my show outline be before recording?

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:10.119 --> 00:00:14.039 Welcome in, everybody, this is Mike Club and today I'm excited to have 2 00:00:14.119 --> 00:00:19.359 back with me co hosting a sweet fish producer. Walt. How you doing 3 00:00:19.399 --> 00:00:23.359 man? Welcome in. I'm doing good. Thanks for having me back. 4 00:00:23.480 --> 00:00:29.039 Glad I didn't scare you the last time. Here we are and UH thrilled 5 00:00:29.039 --> 00:00:32.039 to get the chat with you about some podcasting news and we'll do a member 6 00:00:32.119 --> 00:00:36.840 highlight and uh, we'll finish up today with a question from our mic club 7 00:00:36.920 --> 00:00:40.359 community. But before we go there, I wanted to ask, like, 8 00:00:40.520 --> 00:00:45.679 what's a podcast episode that you've listened to, let's say in the last week 9 00:00:46.079 --> 00:00:49.320 or two weeks, that you heard and you're like man, that's a good 10 00:00:49.320 --> 00:00:51.960 episode, this is a good show. I want to highlight a couple. 11 00:00:52.000 --> 00:00:55.520 So what sticks out to you, walt? Yes, I'm glad you asked 12 00:00:55.520 --> 00:00:58.200 this question too, because I don't get to talk about this show enough. 13 00:00:58.520 --> 00:01:03.000 Um, the shows called truth be told. It's by Tonia Moseley. Um, 14 00:01:03.159 --> 00:01:08.040 really great show, and this particular episode is called the source and it 15 00:01:08.120 --> 00:01:15.200 was basically about black Americans and food deserts and it's a topic that's probably not 16 00:01:15.239 --> 00:01:19.519 talked about enough. But just from like a podcast production perspective like, well, 17 00:01:19.599 --> 00:01:23.400 the episode was great, but from the production perspective is just so well 18 00:01:23.640 --> 00:01:27.319 done. It tied in the host's own narrative. She brought in a few 19 00:01:27.319 --> 00:01:34.280 different guests who told the story of her and her child, like serving McDonald's 20 00:01:34.280 --> 00:01:37.519 at a birthday party and no one was here for it, and really like 21 00:01:37.560 --> 00:01:42.719 the history of McDonald's presence in America, the investment in the black community and 22 00:01:42.760 --> 00:01:48.280 its just tied in a lot of different elements, interviewing, research, journalism. 23 00:01:48.719 --> 00:01:53.760 The music was beautifully added in in a way that wasn't distracting but added 24 00:01:53.840 --> 00:01:59.000 to the whole story. It was like a true story all wrapped up in 25 00:01:59.200 --> 00:02:01.079 one episode oat and it was just like, well done. I want to 26 00:02:01.079 --> 00:02:07.480 go shake the hand of the production teams of like yes, did it well. 27 00:02:07.519 --> 00:02:09.000 Now I got to check it out. You really sold the production of 28 00:02:09.039 --> 00:02:15.479 the episode. Did you say food deserts? Yeah, food deserts. So 29 00:02:15.840 --> 00:02:20.120 that's basically yes, Um, y'all, do not quote me because I'm not 30 00:02:20.159 --> 00:02:23.039 I'm not the expert in it, but essentially food deserts, Um. You 31 00:02:23.080 --> 00:02:27.400 think about dessert, right, there's nothing there. When it comes to food 32 00:02:27.400 --> 00:02:31.120 deserts, it's essentially the same thing. Like a lot of times in Um, 33 00:02:31.479 --> 00:02:36.479 certain communities, lower income communities, a lot of black communities. Um, 34 00:02:36.520 --> 00:02:38.840 there will be a lot of restaurants, there's always something to eat, 35 00:02:38.919 --> 00:02:43.000 but the quality of food that's there. Yeah, it's like the grocery store 36 00:02:43.039 --> 00:02:47.240 situation right. Like I know a lot of like dollar trees and like dollar 37 00:02:47.360 --> 00:02:53.840 stores are in a lot of rural communities and a big part of that is, 38 00:02:53.879 --> 00:02:57.479 like grocery stores don't want to invest getting fresh produced to those communities. 39 00:02:57.520 --> 00:03:02.680 So then you see like in goods and uh, like that's that's why dollar 40 00:03:02.759 --> 00:03:07.800 tree has that aisle of like food, so you could sort of grocery shop 41 00:03:07.840 --> 00:03:09.919 into dollar store. But it's not healthy food, it's not good food, 42 00:03:10.360 --> 00:03:16.039 and dollar stores just eat up these communities. Um, yes, it's interesting, 43 00:03:16.120 --> 00:03:20.719 man, you never heard of it's great for great for balloons, not 44 00:03:20.759 --> 00:03:24.159 great for groceries. You know, you'll see a fancy popelines being entered, 45 00:03:24.199 --> 00:03:30.639 like being built brand new and everything, but you won't see like a like 46 00:03:30.719 --> 00:03:35.759 a public or sprouts or whole foods, the restaurants. They're just all across 47 00:03:35.800 --> 00:03:39.879 the board. Quality of food, access to it doesn't exist. Learning About 48 00:03:39.919 --> 00:03:44.159 Food Deserts on my club today I didn't think it were going to come here 49 00:03:44.240 --> 00:03:46.919 for that, but that's that's super interesting. Will definitely link to that show 50 00:03:47.159 --> 00:03:50.919 in the show notes if people want to check it out and see what high 51 00:03:51.000 --> 00:03:54.479 quality producing looks like. uh, it sounds fantastic. I haven't heard it 52 00:03:54.560 --> 00:03:57.759 yet, but I'll give it a listen. I'M gonna highlight a show that's 53 00:03:57.800 --> 00:04:00.680 on the completely other end of the spectrum. It's for well known, it's 54 00:04:00.719 --> 00:04:05.080 not really that highly produced, but it shows that you can win in podcasting 55 00:04:05.080 --> 00:04:09.280 in multiple ways. So I want to talk about Tim Ferris for a second 56 00:04:09.319 --> 00:04:15.120 and specifically because yesterday I was re listening, uh, I like I got 57 00:04:15.120 --> 00:04:16.399 thirty forty minutes in and I was like, oh my gosh, this is 58 00:04:16.439 --> 00:04:19.160 so good, I need to re listen to the first thirty forty minutes again. 59 00:04:19.519 --> 00:04:25.879 So He's interviewing this guy will mccaskell, who will is famous for effective 60 00:04:25.879 --> 00:04:30.600 altruism and this idea of like, how can we do the most possible good? 61 00:04:31.240 --> 00:04:36.439 And he's very like data and stats and he keeps track of like the 62 00:04:36.519 --> 00:04:41.319 good he does in the world and how he does it, and they talk 63 00:04:41.360 --> 00:04:46.079 about this. They talk about long termism, this way of thinking of like, 64 00:04:46.120 --> 00:04:51.240 what are we doing in our lifetime that will positively impact generations from now, 65 00:04:51.399 --> 00:04:56.120 and is there any way that we could get more people to think like 66 00:04:56.199 --> 00:05:00.720 that, or are we just doomed to think about our lifetime in our little 67 00:05:00.319 --> 00:05:03.480 pocket of the world and what's most comfortable for us? And like, how 68 00:05:03.480 --> 00:05:08.959 could you get buy in from more people to think long term? And it's 69 00:05:09.000 --> 00:05:14.639 just a super fascinating discussion. It's really like I I love the idea of 70 00:05:15.240 --> 00:05:20.920 living from core values, from having a life that impacts others positively and their 71 00:05:21.000 --> 00:05:26.759 their breakdown of it is much more science than art and much more action rather 72 00:05:26.800 --> 00:05:30.519 than just constantly like thinking about all the good you could do, and I 73 00:05:30.560 --> 00:05:33.319 really appreciated it. I love a good interviewer. I love someone that can 74 00:05:33.319 --> 00:05:38.959 ask deep questions and can hold their space well, and Tim is obviously a 75 00:05:38.959 --> 00:05:42.639 fantastic interviewer. That's why his show has blown up. But also like his 76 00:05:42.720 --> 00:05:47.399 audio recording quality. Man, it's not good, like there's an echo in 77 00:05:47.439 --> 00:05:53.439 the room. It's not like the production. He reads ads for like the 78 00:05:53.480 --> 00:05:58.839 first five minutes of his show, like it's not. But but because he's 79 00:05:58.879 --> 00:06:03.439 found his niche and what he's curious about. You can win if you're in 80 00:06:03.519 --> 00:06:06.600 your zone of genius, and so I love that you highlighted like a highly 81 00:06:06.639 --> 00:06:13.920 produced show. Clearly that team is in the Arizona Genius and doing podcasting the 82 00:06:13.959 --> 00:06:15.959 way that they can do it, like, to the best of their ability, 83 00:06:15.959 --> 00:06:19.680 and I think he's obviously found his sweet spot as well on the other 84 00:06:19.759 --> 00:06:25.000 end of the spectrum, and I just like highlighting how different people win in 85 00:06:25.079 --> 00:06:29.439 different ways. UH, so I'll link to that episode as well. You 86 00:06:29.439 --> 00:06:32.240 should have no trouble finding the Tim Ferres show, though. I can't wait 87 00:06:32.279 --> 00:06:35.519 to check that out. Familiar with Tim Ferris and I'm realizing I've actually never 88 00:06:35.560 --> 00:06:40.040 listened to an episode. So that episode sounds super interesting. So we're putting 89 00:06:40.079 --> 00:06:43.639 each other on today. Like it. Yeah, skip like the first five 90 00:06:43.680 --> 00:06:46.959 minutes. He does have the best, in my opinion, like some of 91 00:06:46.959 --> 00:06:49.240 the best ad reads, because he won't promote things that he doesn't actually like, 92 00:06:49.800 --> 00:06:53.959 use or enjoy. Like he has to be very bought into the sponsors. 93 00:06:54.120 --> 00:06:58.000 So if you ever want to learn something about how to do sponsorships effectively, 94 00:06:58.680 --> 00:07:00.759 I think tim is a good person to check out. It's just that 95 00:07:00.800 --> 00:07:04.120 it's, let's, way too much in my opinion, so all right, 96 00:07:04.519 --> 00:07:10.519 let's let's get to the news here and we're gonna highlight three stories. And 97 00:07:10.560 --> 00:07:14.120 it was funny because Walt and I were talking about before, before recording, 98 00:07:14.160 --> 00:07:16.920 we were talking about like the power of video and how it's it's just very 99 00:07:17.000 --> 00:07:24.079 necessary now in podcasting to be thinking about how video can enhance your show or 100 00:07:24.199 --> 00:07:28.120 how you can be on youtube and these different platforms. We're recording this on 101 00:07:28.199 --> 00:07:30.959 riverside right now and there's video here as well as audio recording. Like a 102 00:07:30.959 --> 00:07:36.920 lot of the podcast recorders are know the importance of video, and so two 103 00:07:36.920 --> 00:07:41.879 of our three stories today end up being about video, and here's the first 104 00:07:41.959 --> 00:07:46.199 one. So remote recording to a riverside, literally what we're recording in right 105 00:07:46.240 --> 00:07:48.279 now, has launched a number of updates, but the one that I thought 106 00:07:48.319 --> 00:07:55.040 was pretty cool is that now you can set up your iphone as a second 107 00:07:55.160 --> 00:08:00.959 camera and, because your iphone can record in four K, you and just 108 00:08:01.160 --> 00:08:03.319 put it on a little tripod on your desk, get a second angle and 109 00:08:03.360 --> 00:08:09.360 instead of needing some sort of fancy switcher, it's just gonna record both and 110 00:08:09.399 --> 00:08:13.360 it's all going to be saved right within in the riverside APP and when you 111 00:08:13.439 --> 00:08:16.079 export, you just export it as a second camera. It's taking the audio 112 00:08:16.160 --> 00:08:20.639 from your mic only, so it doesn't even record audio on your iphone. 113 00:08:20.240 --> 00:08:24.800 It's just golden. It's all set and it's ready for you and it would 114 00:08:24.800 --> 00:08:28.120 make if you edit video and the script or you, you know, send 115 00:08:28.120 --> 00:08:30.839 it to a third party. It's all gonna be time stamped the same. 116 00:08:30.920 --> 00:08:35.799 So it's super convenient and I'm actually gonna be working on my studio set up 117 00:08:35.440 --> 00:08:39.879 today to try to figure out how I want to do this, because I 118 00:08:39.879 --> 00:08:45.039 think like second camera sounds so complicated, but they're making it easy. Man. 119 00:08:45.200 --> 00:08:48.559 What did you think about this? Uh, this update? Oh, 120 00:08:48.600 --> 00:08:52.080 man, this, when I saw this, I was like, Oh, 121 00:08:52.480 --> 00:08:54.919 you're for real, what you're you're doing this for everyone, man. This 122 00:08:56.159 --> 00:08:58.639 like update is really, really important. Like when I um, when I 123 00:08:58.639 --> 00:09:03.799 speak to people who are wanting to just start their podcast, whether it's a 124 00:09:03.919 --> 00:09:07.519 business or an individual group of friends, always ask them like what your budget? 125 00:09:09.039 --> 00:09:11.559 And no one ever thinks about the budget at first. And I asked 126 00:09:11.600 --> 00:09:18.000 because podcasting can be an extremely expensive pursuit. Um to be able to switch 127 00:09:18.080 --> 00:09:24.279 cameras before this update, you would definitely need at least like two different tools. 128 00:09:24.440 --> 00:09:28.799 And both of them costs some money's Um. So adding this feature in 129 00:09:30.039 --> 00:09:35.440 it just makes it more accessible, just another level of production more accessible. 130 00:09:35.559 --> 00:09:39.000 Um, like one of my favorite quotes ever from Arthur ash is basically like 131 00:09:39.039 --> 00:09:41.879 do what you can, use what you have and start where you are. 132 00:09:43.480 --> 00:09:48.480 Um. And this just makes it so that you could actually just start so 133 00:09:48.519 --> 00:09:52.759 now with to get that second angle, to add this whole new element to 134 00:09:52.919 --> 00:09:56.080 make sure your show is dynamic, or videos dynamic, is not staleless, 135 00:09:56.120 --> 00:10:00.399 not just one shot. Now all you literally need is a Web Cam date 136 00:10:00.480 --> 00:10:05.080 you can get for and use the phone that you already have. So I 137 00:10:05.159 --> 00:10:09.759 love this feature. I think there's well, what I'M gonna try. I 138 00:10:09.759 --> 00:10:11.039 don't know if this works yet, so you can't quote me on it, 139 00:10:11.440 --> 00:10:16.279 but I'M gonna try recording my second camera in like a portrait like Tiktok, 140 00:10:16.600 --> 00:10:22.799 you know, ready mode. So if it will, if it'll take like 141 00:10:22.879 --> 00:10:24.480 that, which I mean even if it's you know, if I have to 142 00:10:24.600 --> 00:10:28.639 rotate the clip, that's fine, but having that as a set up so 143 00:10:30.200 --> 00:10:33.480 I can crop my I have my cannon m fifty. I can crop that 144 00:10:33.559 --> 00:10:37.799 shot if I want and to be like a close up on a on a 145 00:10:37.840 --> 00:10:41.399 tiktok or a youtube shorts, but then for my iphone set up to have 146 00:10:41.480 --> 00:10:46.039 it like right to the to the left of my computer, and just it's 147 00:10:46.080 --> 00:10:50.279 already in portrait. It's already ready for it, and the whole conversation you 148 00:10:50.320 --> 00:10:52.519 can see my mic, you can see maybe part of my computer and and 149 00:10:52.559 --> 00:10:56.159 then you can see my face, like it's already ready to go. There's 150 00:10:56.159 --> 00:11:00.879 something there that you can you just get get more creative of. I love 151 00:11:00.960 --> 00:11:03.960 the ability to get more creative when you have more than one camera, and 152 00:11:03.000 --> 00:11:07.159 most people with more than one camera you're just like a more complex studio. 153 00:11:07.200 --> 00:11:11.600 But now your iphone is all you need. Yeah, and it's actually I 154 00:11:11.639 --> 00:11:16.559 think it would probably like elevate how people just view you, right because, 155 00:11:16.600 --> 00:11:18.679 like, I don't know if you even noticed, but like those there's a 156 00:11:18.759 --> 00:11:22.080 lot of videos like where people are like sharing like how to do something and 157 00:11:22.120 --> 00:11:24.919 they get super high level and the talk will they do it like you know, 158 00:11:24.240 --> 00:11:26.480 in the camera, but every now and then you'll see a video where 159 00:11:26.519 --> 00:11:30.200 it's off to the side, he's getting that side look, and so it's 160 00:11:30.200 --> 00:11:33.960 almost like, oh, what am I seeing? I'm like peeping into some 161 00:11:33.080 --> 00:11:37.919 behind the scenes stuff. Riverside, making it look like you got a lot 162 00:11:37.000 --> 00:11:41.799 going on, even though you might just be like this is on top, 163 00:11:41.840 --> 00:11:43.679 party on the bottom, like this is uh. This is definitely a great 164 00:11:43.679 --> 00:11:48.559 way to raise your raise your I don't know what you call it, but 165 00:11:48.679 --> 00:11:52.320 just level up on Social Yep. I will say if you guys want to 166 00:11:52.320 --> 00:11:56.799 see a cool micro video cut, go look up the Rick Roll podcast and 167 00:11:58.600 --> 00:12:03.240 he's doing this the edits where he has like a super wide shot video and 168 00:12:03.279 --> 00:12:09.200 they he always interviews his guests in person at like a really long table and 169 00:12:09.240 --> 00:12:13.919 they each sit on one side and he wants the video look really crisp, 170 00:12:13.000 --> 00:12:16.320 so it's all a black background, it's a wood desk, they always have 171 00:12:16.360 --> 00:12:22.720 like matching glasses of water and it's so he's already got like his aesthetic built 172 00:12:22.759 --> 00:12:26.360 in. But then you typically right, like when you think of a micro 173 00:12:26.440 --> 00:12:31.360 clip of video, it's just like a person talking into a camera and they 174 00:12:31.399 --> 00:12:35.159 have those tight angles on both him and his guest. But they have this 175 00:12:35.320 --> 00:12:41.039 wide shot that shows the whole table and each guests on the sides and they 176 00:12:41.120 --> 00:12:45.799 cut that video and they put that at the top of their youtube shorts or 177 00:12:45.799 --> 00:12:48.840 Tiktok. So you can see the whole table and the two of them talking, 178 00:12:48.039 --> 00:12:52.480 and then whoever's talking gets the majority of the screen, where it's like 179 00:12:52.519 --> 00:12:56.440 actually still the close up that we're typically used to, and they have both 180 00:12:56.639 --> 00:13:01.000 overlaid on top of each other. It is so smart. It is such 181 00:13:01.000 --> 00:13:05.399 a cool angle and a cool shot and I love watching people get creative with 182 00:13:05.440 --> 00:13:09.000 it. Oh Man, that that's really what it's all about, right. 183 00:13:09.039 --> 00:13:11.279 People are like, oh, how should I do how should I do that? 184 00:13:11.360 --> 00:13:13.879 Well, like, as you can see, this features like a new 185 00:13:13.960 --> 00:13:18.600 riverside feature. It's like, what the like? The way to do something 186 00:13:18.720 --> 00:13:24.000 is still being created, like just continue to just put to the boundaries, 187 00:13:24.039 --> 00:13:26.600 because that way it maybe trash and may we like never do that again, 188 00:13:26.840 --> 00:13:31.480 or it could be the future of how other people model their content. So 189 00:13:31.759 --> 00:13:33.960 I'M gonna gonna check that out because I'm gonna see what I could do with 190 00:13:33.000 --> 00:13:39.120 it. Awesome. Okay, the second podcast story, but it's it's a 191 00:13:39.240 --> 00:13:43.399 video thing again, is from Youtube. Youtube added a new option to cut 192 00:13:43.600 --> 00:13:50.519 long form videos into shorts. So this just gets right back after what I 193 00:13:50.559 --> 00:13:54.000 feel like I've been we've been preaching sermons on this on this podcast. I've 194 00:13:54.000 --> 00:13:56.039 been talking we've been talking about on Bob. Growth. We're really doubling down 195 00:13:56.039 --> 00:14:01.480 on video and it's going to get easier and easier for those that are creating 196 00:14:01.559 --> 00:14:05.799 video content, because that's what youtube shorts wants, that's what Tiktok wants, 197 00:14:05.799 --> 00:14:09.679 that's what instagram reels it's all about. And so this is, I think, 198 00:14:11.759 --> 00:14:16.440 brilliant for Youtube, because what sets youtube apart from Tiktok? Youtube has 199 00:14:16.519 --> 00:14:20.720 long form video content. So what if you uploaded your long term long form 200 00:14:20.840 --> 00:14:26.159 video content and could instantly cut it and it, or it would cut it 201 00:14:26.200 --> 00:14:30.679 for you, put it into reels and then now you're discoverable in or there. 202 00:14:30.840 --> 00:14:33.200 I guess they're called shorts, but like in their youtube shorts algorithms. 203 00:14:33.440 --> 00:14:39.120 So if you have a podcast, the best clips of that automatically are now 204 00:14:39.159 --> 00:14:43.960 digestible in short form, and Youtube has built it into where that that youtube 205 00:14:43.960 --> 00:14:46.639 short clip, if they click on the description, they go right to the 206 00:14:46.720 --> 00:14:50.799 long form content. So if they like your clip enough, they can just 207 00:14:50.840 --> 00:14:56.600 go watch the full episode. Absolutely brilliant on their part. Definitely needs to 208 00:14:56.639 --> 00:15:00.519 be part of your podcast strategy and I'll say we're guilty be to be growth. 209 00:15:00.559 --> 00:15:03.679 We're just now figuring out how do we use long form video content. 210 00:15:03.759 --> 00:15:09.399 We've only been doing micro videos and it's just this is what a convenient way 211 00:15:09.440 --> 00:15:13.480 to get in the game, man, right. Mm Hmmm, take like 212 00:15:13.639 --> 00:15:18.120 probably reduced this production time. But this feature, like you, if you're 213 00:15:18.159 --> 00:15:22.279 if you're in this podcast and gave me, probably already had no or have 214 00:15:22.320 --> 00:15:24.879 a good idea of where the clips can be. So, like, if 215 00:15:24.879 --> 00:15:28.759 you're doing this, you upload it and you literally just picked the time stamps, 216 00:15:28.159 --> 00:15:31.919 maybe add a little caption and youtube takes care of everything else. Like 217 00:15:33.000 --> 00:15:37.080 this is amazing. Like, Um, the thing that people don't well, 218 00:15:37.440 --> 00:15:39.960 the biggest thing about like Tiktok reel's youtube shorts, is like the discoverability. 219 00:15:41.039 --> 00:15:43.879 That's the best feature of it. These short form videos are being pushed, 220 00:15:43.919 --> 00:15:48.440 literally shoved in the faces of other people. Like Youtube, Tiktok, instagram, 221 00:15:48.480 --> 00:15:52.559 they work really hard to make sure people are seeing new stuff every day. 222 00:15:52.759 --> 00:15:56.480 As far as these real stuff and the ability to link it back to 223 00:15:56.519 --> 00:16:00.200 the longer form video. That takes care of any call to action. Any 224 00:16:00.240 --> 00:16:03.240 how do I find the show is literally a click of a button. So 225 00:16:03.320 --> 00:16:07.200 this feature, if you're not using it now, don't worry. You can 226 00:16:07.240 --> 00:16:11.720 get started today. It's there for everyone. The thing I'm interested on this 227 00:16:11.759 --> 00:16:17.600 one is I wonder how, like you know, most micro videos that get 228 00:16:17.720 --> 00:16:23.879 traction have captions, like live captions and like cool some sort of upscaling on 229 00:16:23.919 --> 00:16:29.200 the editing front. So you do need to be thinking through that. I 230 00:16:29.200 --> 00:16:33.000 would be like I would be testing how does a micro video work when it's 231 00:16:33.120 --> 00:16:40.159 just pulled straight in this new format, versus the typical editing, adding maybe 232 00:16:40.159 --> 00:16:45.759 some music, adding some pop up captions as you go. It'll be interesting 233 00:16:45.759 --> 00:16:48.440 to see how those features start like playing together in the long run, and 234 00:16:48.440 --> 00:16:52.559 I'm sure there will be updates to this that will continue to make it better, 235 00:16:52.600 --> 00:16:56.799 but that is one one area that I'm sure they'll have to to continue 236 00:16:56.840 --> 00:17:03.279 to iterate on. That'll be the biggest chance story here. And this is 237 00:17:03.279 --> 00:17:06.400 going to take us over to Linkedin, but I know a lot of us 238 00:17:06.400 --> 00:17:11.039 are thinking about okay, we've created this podcast content and you know, for 239 00:17:11.160 --> 00:17:15.200 us in the B two B podcasting space, we're trying to repurpose that content 240 00:17:15.319 --> 00:17:18.240 on Linkedin and I found an article this week I was talking about what to 241 00:17:18.319 --> 00:17:23.640 post on Linkedin. Five content types that work best, and so I'M gonna 242 00:17:23.799 --> 00:17:26.880 list off the five wall and I'll just have you pick one that sticks out 243 00:17:26.920 --> 00:17:30.200 to you and we can kind of discuss here. But the five that they 244 00:17:30.240 --> 00:17:36.559 suggest, the five content types, would be blog posts, third party content, 245 00:17:37.240 --> 00:17:42.599 native video, text only and photography and illustrations. When you hear those 246 00:17:42.640 --> 00:17:49.200 five does does one of them seem to jump out at you? Yes, 247 00:17:49.400 --> 00:17:55.839 actually, and it's text. Um, text is king on Linkedin, but 248 00:17:55.920 --> 00:18:00.279 I think the what everyone really needs to do is focus on having like a 249 00:18:00.400 --> 00:18:06.160 hybrid of it all. It shouldn't just be one thing. Um To really 250 00:18:06.640 --> 00:18:11.519 grow on Linkedin, it's not just about finding the template stick in to it, 251 00:18:11.519 --> 00:18:17.920 it's about really bringing some value and after whilst a text post over and 252 00:18:17.960 --> 00:18:19.400 over and over again, even though it Joe's text, a text posts over 253 00:18:19.400 --> 00:18:22.440 and over again, it'll work, but to truly stand out you want to 254 00:18:22.480 --> 00:18:26.039 have a mixture of all of the above. But the real reason why I 255 00:18:26.119 --> 00:18:30.240 chose text, even though Texas king text posts, they still work incredibly well, 256 00:18:30.400 --> 00:18:34.200 is because, Um, a video posts, a native video post that 257 00:18:34.240 --> 00:18:38.039 you post with a simple caption, it'll work, but when you combine it 258 00:18:38.119 --> 00:18:45.279 with a lengthy text caption, it's gonna do even more right now video is 259 00:18:45.319 --> 00:18:49.960 growing on all platforms. Linkedin it's doesn't linkedin's video doesn't have the same effect 260 00:18:49.960 --> 00:18:53.960 as like a tiktok video, but Um, it's it's it's rising, it's 261 00:18:53.960 --> 00:18:59.119 growing more important and when you do pair like a super strong text post with 262 00:18:59.279 --> 00:19:03.240 video, it gives people an option to watch the video, listen to the 263 00:19:03.319 --> 00:19:07.519 video or just read the post. So having that combination of the two, 264 00:19:07.640 --> 00:19:11.720 I would actually create like a text video baby and like that's the thing you 265 00:19:11.720 --> 00:19:15.160 need to bring out into the world. Um that that should be the main 266 00:19:15.200 --> 00:19:18.559 goal. But switching up the types of content. Um, when I was 267 00:19:18.599 --> 00:19:23.279 in a linkedin creator accelerator program they advised to Um, create different types of 268 00:19:23.319 --> 00:19:26.720 posts throughout the week, just as long as one of them is video, 269 00:19:26.880 --> 00:19:30.839 and that just shows us how important video is and will continue to be. 270 00:19:30.960 --> 00:19:36.519 So yeah, that's that's my recommendation. Text Video, but just make sure 271 00:19:36.640 --> 00:19:40.119 there's a strong text p post to go with it. I like the variety. 272 00:19:40.319 --> 00:19:44.039 I like that you spoke to that because I think when you're thinking of 273 00:19:44.079 --> 00:19:48.559 content types, just as it's the same thing, like you don't want to 274 00:19:48.599 --> 00:19:51.240 eat the same dinner seven nights in a row, right, like it just 275 00:19:51.279 --> 00:19:55.519 gets boring. People don't want to consume your content in the same format every 276 00:19:55.519 --> 00:20:00.480 time, and if you're trying also to have people understand more of who you 277 00:20:00.519 --> 00:20:03.359 are and your personality on a platform, then you need to give them variety 278 00:20:03.400 --> 00:20:07.640 and how they interact with you, and so that's one of the quickest ways 279 00:20:07.680 --> 00:20:11.440 to do that is just to switch up the type of posts or Combo some 280 00:20:11.599 --> 00:20:17.319 of these and uh, I think it's interesting for podcasters specifically, because a 281 00:20:17.319 --> 00:20:21.079 lot of times we think, okay, if we have a video, then 282 00:20:21.559 --> 00:20:25.160 we'll just cut it into micro clips and that will be our content on Linkedin, 283 00:20:25.680 --> 00:20:27.799 and that's a starting place. Absolutely. There's some people that aren't even 284 00:20:27.839 --> 00:20:30.960 there yet. Totally fine. It's good time to get in the water, 285 00:20:32.039 --> 00:20:36.079 get in the game. But if you're there and you're going, how else 286 00:20:36.079 --> 00:20:38.880 should I be repurposing content? You can go back and listen to any of 287 00:20:38.880 --> 00:20:44.279 your episodes at any time and you can find a concept that you guys talked 288 00:20:44.279 --> 00:20:48.440 about and you can post a quote from that show. You can post the 289 00:20:48.440 --> 00:20:51.599 biggest points and you don't even have to link back to the podcast. You 290 00:20:51.720 --> 00:20:56.519 just got a text post from an old episode and that can live on as 291 00:20:56.640 --> 00:21:00.759 a piece of content. The other thing is you have blogs on your website 292 00:21:00.279 --> 00:21:03.680 and those blogs are great. They even tell you like a blog post is 293 00:21:03.680 --> 00:21:08.000 something that's great to post. But where many B two B companies make mistakes 294 00:21:08.559 --> 00:21:12.279 is they post their blog on linkedin and think people are going to read it. 295 00:21:12.319 --> 00:21:18.359 It's just a link and I even think it's a mistake. Maybe what 296 00:21:18.440 --> 00:21:19.920 you're saying well, like I think I tend to agree more with what you 297 00:21:19.920 --> 00:21:25.000 said, like if you did a long form, really thought out piece of 298 00:21:25.000 --> 00:21:27.480 written content and then Lin linked to a blog, maybe it would work, 299 00:21:27.519 --> 00:21:33.400 but because the blog is more reading, I actually think it's more effective to 300 00:21:33.519 --> 00:21:37.680 just not make people click through to the blog, like just make a long 301 00:21:37.960 --> 00:21:45.240 text posts on Linkedin that adds value and doesn't link off the platform. You 302 00:21:45.279 --> 00:21:48.279 have tons of blogs that you could do that with. You don't even have 303 00:21:48.319 --> 00:21:51.839 to post the whole thing. Just post the most valuable content from each of 304 00:21:51.880 --> 00:21:56.680 those blogs and you've probably got months worth of content right there. When you 305 00:21:56.720 --> 00:22:00.279 start to see how easily you can repurpose things, oh, we have this 306 00:22:00.359 --> 00:22:04.279 blog post that can now become a podcast if we just change it up slightly, 307 00:22:04.759 --> 00:22:07.279 and now we can infuse our P O v in a different way and 308 00:22:07.319 --> 00:22:11.480 people can hear our voices or see us on video. Like there's so many 309 00:22:11.480 --> 00:22:15.200 ways to do this. And then I really liked, honestly, that they 310 00:22:15.240 --> 00:22:19.960 threw in photography and illustrations. That's like not something you see that much of, 311 00:22:21.000 --> 00:22:22.799 but if you have that talent, there are a few people I see 312 00:22:22.799 --> 00:22:27.559 on Linkedin that really win in that category because they can do just even like 313 00:22:27.680 --> 00:22:33.000 simple drawings, and people love it on on the platform. M Hmm. 314 00:22:33.079 --> 00:22:37.400 There's a reason why instagram worked. People love looking at pictures, seeing what's 315 00:22:37.400 --> 00:22:41.920 going on in your life outside of work. Even when you do that, 316 00:22:41.200 --> 00:22:47.519 it's it's going to succeed as a business capturing what's going on in the workplace 317 00:22:47.519 --> 00:22:51.240 and events you were at. Um Special Project there. There's a lot of 318 00:22:51.279 --> 00:22:55.039 things that can be captured in an image until a really beautiful story. and 319 00:22:55.119 --> 00:22:59.279 Um there's one other thing that was on that list, but it's it's very 320 00:22:59.400 --> 00:23:04.720 underrated and it'll have a lot of potential, and that's going live on Linkedin. 321 00:23:06.440 --> 00:23:10.160 Lincoln has live streams, which you need a third party school to do, 322 00:23:10.240 --> 00:23:14.359 but very effective. And then live audio. If you've heard of clubhouse, 323 00:23:14.440 --> 00:23:18.200 twitter spaces, you've probably heard all the horror stories and all of that 324 00:23:18.319 --> 00:23:22.119 is true on those platforms, but linkedin live audio it's it's really special and 325 00:23:22.160 --> 00:23:26.119 I've used it a lot. That's the thing I've done the most consistently. 326 00:23:26.119 --> 00:23:30.160 It's a great way to build relationships with people who you just connected with but 327 00:23:30.319 --> 00:23:34.319 haven't really gottenstance to schedule that call. Way Too busy, or to meet 328 00:23:34.359 --> 00:23:38.559 New People. I've met some really incredible people through doing linkedin audio and it's 329 00:23:38.559 --> 00:23:44.039 still such a new thing that you can can actually create your own space on 330 00:23:44.079 --> 00:23:49.720 the platform. So Um Lincoln audio live streaming super underrated. It is effective, 331 00:23:51.279 --> 00:23:53.519 takes skill, takes talent, takes time to figure out, but highly 332 00:23:53.640 --> 00:24:00.400 recommend looking into it. All right, let's go to our member highlight here 333 00:24:00.440 --> 00:24:04.559 and today I want to talk about growth marketing camp. Rex used to be 334 00:24:04.640 --> 00:24:10.119 on our team. Before he was on our team, he actually hosted growth 335 00:24:10.160 --> 00:24:12.960 marketing camp for a time. Uh. That's it's a show produced by open 336 00:24:14.039 --> 00:24:18.519 sense and I love the branding around growth marketing camp. I think it's really 337 00:24:18.599 --> 00:24:22.599 fun, very like. It's camp vibes, got a little camp fire on 338 00:24:22.680 --> 00:24:26.359 their art and they do a great job with their their micro clips and the 339 00:24:26.400 --> 00:24:30.759 way that they promote the show, but here's what they say about about the 340 00:24:30.759 --> 00:24:36.440 podcast. This is their description. We're lighting up the Campfire and swapping stories 341 00:24:36.480 --> 00:24:41.519 on everything involved in building a brand, scaling a startup, launching new products 342 00:24:41.160 --> 00:24:49.799 and and unembellished career talk from the brand builders that we admire most. I 343 00:24:49.880 --> 00:24:55.400 love all of what they're highlighting there. It's a fun way to still talk 344 00:24:55.480 --> 00:24:59.720 topics with experts but bring it in in a little bit of a fresh, 345 00:25:00.359 --> 00:25:03.519 uh perspective, and they do that in several ways. So, uh, 346 00:25:03.640 --> 00:25:07.599 I think the number one reason I picked this as our member highlight today is 347 00:25:07.640 --> 00:25:12.640 because of their branding and I think a lot of B two B podcasts are 348 00:25:12.799 --> 00:25:18.720 still lacking in their art and in their creative like they're proud that they now 349 00:25:18.799 --> 00:25:23.039 have a show and they think that that's creative, but there's so much more 350 00:25:23.079 --> 00:25:29.319 that goes around a podcast that makes it truly uh, I don't know, 351 00:25:29.440 --> 00:25:32.799 standout, I guess in my mind. And so specifically, if you want 352 00:25:32.799 --> 00:25:34.839 to learn some things around branding, I would I would take a look at 353 00:25:34.880 --> 00:25:38.720 at growth marketing camp and uh, we we want to shout you guys out 354 00:25:38.720 --> 00:25:42.119 because you guys who do an excellent work and bonus because you've been doing it 355 00:25:42.160 --> 00:25:45.359 for a long time. This is not a podcast that is like a flash 356 00:25:45.400 --> 00:25:48.559 in the PAN. You know, we're not congratulating you on your first five 357 00:25:48.599 --> 00:25:53.039 episodes like you've been have been in the game for a bit. So growth 358 00:25:53.039 --> 00:25:56.640 marketing camp. We we recommend going and checking them out. All right. 359 00:25:56.680 --> 00:26:00.960 Well, let's wrap up this episode with a question from our linkedin mic club 360 00:26:02.000 --> 00:26:04.359 community. And here's the question for today and I'll pose it at you first. 361 00:26:04.440 --> 00:26:10.599 You take it where you want. How detailed should my show outline be 362 00:26:10.599 --> 00:26:18.119 before we actually hit record? It's gonna be different for everybody. Um, 363 00:26:18.680 --> 00:26:25.359 I I have some structure to my shows where I like to keep it very 364 00:26:25.480 --> 00:26:29.279 organic. I tell every guest like, here's the antennas structure, but I'm 365 00:26:29.279 --> 00:26:32.920 ready to throw it all out the window as soon as we hit record. 366 00:26:33.359 --> 00:26:37.839 And the reason I do that is because I like to just go deeper into 367 00:26:37.920 --> 00:26:41.039 something that a guest mentioned bring and just just flow naturally and have a really 368 00:26:41.079 --> 00:26:45.839 great conversation. But that's something I'm personally good at and even though I have 369 00:26:45.920 --> 00:26:51.799 a very just like fluid, organic conversation, Um approach to it, I'm 370 00:26:51.839 --> 00:26:56.400 actually very detailed with my show notes that my prep talk. I have links 371 00:26:56.440 --> 00:27:02.240 to resources, stats ready to go, and it's because, Um, if 372 00:27:02.279 --> 00:27:06.279 I have as much like, if I'm very structured, then I can just 373 00:27:06.359 --> 00:27:08.839 be free and flow. So when I do my prep, I like to 374 00:27:08.839 --> 00:27:12.039 look up the guests, everything about them. I like to truly study them, 375 00:27:12.119 --> 00:27:17.000 what shows they've been on before, anything they mentioned on a previous episode 376 00:27:17.039 --> 00:27:19.440 that they didn't go deep enough in. But I have some more questions on, 377 00:27:19.920 --> 00:27:23.480 or even just like some topics that I actually want to talk about with 378 00:27:23.559 --> 00:27:29.519 them and just making sure that I'm just as knowledgeable as they are. I 379 00:27:29.599 --> 00:27:33.839 learned that from a show called earnier leisure. Every episode they're learning something new 380 00:27:33.880 --> 00:27:37.519 from their guests, but they make sure they're familiar with that topic as well. 381 00:27:37.920 --> 00:27:41.680 So, Um, I have used notion and I like it because I 382 00:27:41.720 --> 00:27:45.960 could break things up in sections, drag and drop. I could have check 383 00:27:45.039 --> 00:27:49.359 boxes next to topics so I could quickly check off everything. I do all 384 00:27:49.440 --> 00:27:52.880 my podcast by myself, so I have to make sure it's very easy for 385 00:27:52.960 --> 00:27:56.960 me to make edits and changes on the go. That's not an ad, 386 00:27:56.000 --> 00:28:00.599 but it should be. Um. Yes, so I like to be superstructured, 387 00:28:00.799 --> 00:28:03.480 very organized, but when it comes down to recording. I just have 388 00:28:03.640 --> 00:28:07.599 this as a backup safety net, for a guide. I think I would 389 00:28:07.599 --> 00:28:12.119 say I'm I'm fairly similar to you in that. Do you find that you're 390 00:28:14.559 --> 00:28:18.400 you edit the way that you write out notes for shows like over time, 391 00:28:19.119 --> 00:28:22.400 or do you feel like you're pretty locked in now you have got your structure 392 00:28:22.440 --> 00:28:29.480 you feel comfortable in it? That's a good question. I like to Um, 393 00:28:29.519 --> 00:28:32.960 I think because podcasting is so new. Well, here's actually a better 394 00:28:33.000 --> 00:28:37.599 example. I have some shows I recorded in end of twenty. I didn't 395 00:28:37.599 --> 00:28:41.079 get to released them because of burnout capacity and then also just like I gotta 396 00:28:41.119 --> 00:28:44.920 save this for later. I'm going back to them now and I'm like, 397 00:28:44.960 --> 00:28:48.960 Oh, I I. I'm a different type of host now. I want 398 00:28:48.960 --> 00:28:52.559 to have a different type of episode, and so when I think about that, 399 00:28:52.680 --> 00:28:56.720 um, when I record episodes, I like to before even pressing record, 400 00:28:57.160 --> 00:29:00.880 I like to envision what I want the episode to sound like at the 401 00:29:02.039 --> 00:29:04.920 end. But when it comes to editing, I'm very comfortable with trying something 402 00:29:04.920 --> 00:29:10.440 new. So as far as like systems, I feel pretty confident on the 403 00:29:10.440 --> 00:29:15.200 approach, but I'm always looking to try a new style at a new segment 404 00:29:15.440 --> 00:29:22.400 just continue to test the waters. For me, I I love writing out 405 00:29:22.799 --> 00:29:26.920 kind of almost word for word, what I'd like to say, specifically in 406 00:29:26.039 --> 00:29:32.599 segments of the podcast where it can get repetitive. Uh. So I start 407 00:29:32.680 --> 00:29:36.720 to think of what's a different way we could say this and how could I 408 00:29:36.720 --> 00:29:41.400 communicate it still be personal and still be authentic, but say it in a 409 00:29:41.680 --> 00:29:44.839 in a different way, and I won't be able to do that quite the 410 00:29:44.920 --> 00:29:47.759 same on the fly as if I wrote out a new way of saying it 411 00:29:47.880 --> 00:29:51.839 verbatim. So I just like put that in my notes and then I noticed 412 00:29:51.880 --> 00:29:56.519 with questions I'll do that too, like what's a different way than I would 413 00:29:56.559 --> 00:29:59.640 typically word this, and like, let's see if I could throw in a 414 00:29:59.720 --> 00:30:03.559 question and like that. Uh. But then I'm very much open at all 415 00:30:03.640 --> 00:30:07.799 times to rabbit trails with guests, specifically, like if I'm interviewing someone and 416 00:30:07.839 --> 00:30:11.279 they say something fascinating, I don't want to be so caught in my notes 417 00:30:11.440 --> 00:30:17.640 that I can't go where they're going. And then also, if we're guides 418 00:30:17.680 --> 00:30:19.880 as podcast hosts, then I'll lead us back out and back to you know, 419 00:30:19.880 --> 00:30:23.079 where we ultimately want to end up. But let's go explore that trail 420 00:30:23.119 --> 00:30:26.559 a little bit because that might end up being, you know, the best 421 00:30:26.559 --> 00:30:30.960 part of the episode. So there's a good push and pull there as a 422 00:30:32.039 --> 00:30:37.279 hoax that you get to to walk on your own and I think there's benefits 423 00:30:37.319 --> 00:30:41.119 to all different types of notes. I've actually gone into some episodes just to 424 00:30:41.200 --> 00:30:45.079 try it. Like I'll tell you I'm I've been working on a side project 425 00:30:45.079 --> 00:30:49.920 and the whole premise of this side project is basically just using like four quotes 426 00:30:49.960 --> 00:30:56.640 from an author, and so for that episode I didn't write out any specific 427 00:30:56.720 --> 00:31:00.680 questions. I only highlighted parts of the quotes that I want to follow up 428 00:31:00.680 --> 00:31:03.480 and talk to the person about, and so it puts me in a different 429 00:31:03.480 --> 00:31:07.839 frame of mind conversationally because I'm thinking, okay, these are things that I 430 00:31:07.880 --> 00:31:14.319 find curious in the quote, but I don't have an outline to rely on 431 00:31:14.400 --> 00:31:17.640 in the same way. So I'm in the conversation differently than I typically would 432 00:31:17.640 --> 00:31:19.599 be, and I don't know if I love that, but I love changing 433 00:31:19.640 --> 00:31:23.480 it up and I love seeing how I can get more engaged in the conversation. 434 00:31:23.960 --> 00:31:30.319 So it is it's just finding your sweet spot, constantly tweaking things. 435 00:31:30.559 --> 00:31:33.559 And then I think segments you mentioned that Walt great idea there too. That's 436 00:31:33.599 --> 00:31:37.200 an easy way if you found a rhythm, but you want to try something 437 00:31:37.200 --> 00:31:41.319 new at a segment and that might force you to rethink things or or find 438 00:31:41.319 --> 00:31:47.440 a new, fresh angle. You know, I have um one, I 439 00:31:47.480 --> 00:31:52.799 guess, podcasting tip that I learned from being an insurance Um. So the 440 00:31:52.880 --> 00:31:56.519 insurance company. I worked with them very surely it's not a great experience, 441 00:31:56.599 --> 00:32:00.079 but I learned a lot from them. Learned a lot. and Um one 442 00:32:00.119 --> 00:32:04.400 thing they had every new agent two has had. They gave us a script 443 00:32:04.599 --> 00:32:09.039 to go through this entire insurance presentation and they really wanted us to say it 444 00:32:09.240 --> 00:32:14.079 verbet a word from word. The scripts stuck, to be honest, um, 445 00:32:14.119 --> 00:32:16.319 but I really had to memorize the whole thing to pass their test. 446 00:32:16.839 --> 00:32:21.119 Um, and I couldn't do it. Like my whole life. Always thought 447 00:32:21.160 --> 00:32:22.440 like if I ever got to be an actor, I wouldn't be able to 448 00:32:22.480 --> 00:32:25.160 go off script. I'd had to add Lib everything because I'm not gonna remember 449 00:32:25.200 --> 00:32:30.839 word from word. But Um, what I learned was to Um write down 450 00:32:30.880 --> 00:32:35.279 bullet points, not the full sentence, not the full script, but bullet 451 00:32:35.279 --> 00:32:38.400 points of each point I want to make and as I'm working to memorize again, 452 00:32:38.480 --> 00:32:42.799 the bullet points are really prompt so when I'm thinking about what the next 453 00:32:42.799 --> 00:32:45.160 thing is, I don't have to think about the the actual full sentence because 454 00:32:45.160 --> 00:32:49.240 deep down I do know it. I just need to remember the prompt the 455 00:32:49.279 --> 00:32:52.279 next prompt in the order. So I used that when it comes to solo 456 00:32:52.400 --> 00:32:57.319 episodes or even like the notes for the podcast, always focused on the prompts, 457 00:32:57.559 --> 00:33:00.680 making it clear so I could remember it. Kind of trigg there's my 458 00:33:00.799 --> 00:33:06.640 memory to be able to recite the full question, the full thought. I 459 00:33:06.720 --> 00:33:10.279 love it. Well, it's been a great episode. Thanks for everyone who 460 00:33:10.319 --> 00:33:15.039 has tuned in and we're trying to bring the news you need to know as 461 00:33:15.039 --> 00:33:19.799 a podcaster. talked a lot about video today, but that's good because we 462 00:33:19.839 --> 00:33:22.440 need to be thinking about it. Talked about how we can be more relevant 463 00:33:22.559 --> 00:33:27.400 on Linkedin as well in different content types, which I think is important for 464 00:33:27.480 --> 00:33:31.240 us. And then again, go check out gross marketing camp and UH, 465 00:33:31.440 --> 00:33:38.079 maybe reach out to Walter I on instagram or on Linkedin as well and tell 466 00:33:38.160 --> 00:33:42.440 us how you're doing your outline for your show. I would love to hear, 467 00:33:43.119 --> 00:33:45.960 even in our linkedin group, different ways that you build an outline and 468 00:33:46.119 --> 00:33:50.240 uh, how you how that maybe has evolved for you as you've been a 469 00:33:50.240 --> 00:33:53.119 host. We appreciate you listening. Walt, thanks for being here. Man, 470 00:33:54.440 --> 00:33:58.640 yes, thanks for bringing me back. All right, everybody, have 471 00:33:58.680 --> 00:34:08.920 a great week. We'll be back next week to another episode. M Hm.