May 2, 2022

Podcasting Simplified, Becoming a Guest, & Show Prep Length


In this episode, Dan Sanchez and Benji Block talk about :

  • Riverside's integration with Anchor
  • Anchors' addition of video podcasting
  • Morning Brew's articles about the perfect length of a podcast ad
  • Member Highlight: Raising Problem Solvers (https://artofproblemsolving.com/blog/podcasts/raising-problem-solvers)
  • The best ways to become a guest on another podcast
  • How much preparation/research should you do leading up to recording a podcast episode with a guest
Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:05.240 --> 00:00:09.480 Welcome back to another episode of mcclub. I'm dance Sanchez and I'm here with 2 00:00:09.560 --> 00:00:14.359 Benji block from sweet fish media and we're going to be covering news, a 3 00:00:14.439 --> 00:00:20.079 member highlight and questions from the BB podcasting community, and I'm excited this week. 4 00:00:20.160 --> 00:00:26.719 This there major announcement happened last it's like one of those small steps that 5 00:00:26.760 --> 00:00:30.480 a company took that was like a big step for the industry, something I've 6 00:00:30.519 --> 00:00:33.520 been waiting for probably over two years, ever since I've started working for this 7 00:00:33.600 --> 00:00:37.399 week fish coming, and it finally dropped today, or at least the first 8 00:00:37.439 --> 00:00:44.240 iteration of it, and that is the spotify riverside announcement. So a press 9 00:00:44.280 --> 00:00:48.920 release was put out from both Riverside, a podcast recording platform they're actually using 10 00:00:49.000 --> 00:00:54.399 record this very podcast, and anchor, which is the podcast hosting company of 11 00:00:54.439 --> 00:01:00.679 spotify, making a deep integration between the two to make it easy to record 12 00:01:00.799 --> 00:01:04.439 straight on Riverside, which you can edit a little bit in riverside and then 13 00:01:04.439 --> 00:01:11.079 push directly to anchor to then publish. It's a small step because technically it's 14 00:01:11.120 --> 00:01:15.159 just an integration of some information passing through to another company where it can be 15 00:01:15.159 --> 00:01:21.280 published, but it's a huge step and that it's just become easy to capture 16 00:01:21.400 --> 00:01:26.000 high quality video and audio and then, with a click of a button, 17 00:01:26.200 --> 00:01:30.159 it's out, no downloading or uploading required. That was always a big up 18 00:01:30.200 --> 00:01:34.239 and a hurdle for podcasting is the amount of media you have to move around. 19 00:01:34.280 --> 00:01:37.000 What do you think about it? I don't know when you started podcasting, 20 00:01:37.079 --> 00:01:40.719 Dan, but the first thing I thought of was six years ago when 21 00:01:40.799 --> 00:01:47.120 I recorded my first episode sitting in a closet underneath my clothes. I had 22 00:01:47.120 --> 00:01:49.159 torn my Chilles, so I'm like on the floor in a hot closet, 23 00:01:49.239 --> 00:01:55.680 have my AC turned off because I wanted to sound okay. I'm thinking about 24 00:01:55.760 --> 00:01:57.920 the fact that I was using Skype, I needed to buy a special call 25 00:01:59.000 --> 00:02:05.359 recorder. I had to then edit and garage band and I you had to 26 00:02:05.439 --> 00:02:09.240 use like Libson for hosting and you had to figure out how to get the 27 00:02:09.319 --> 00:02:15.759 right code over to apple to post the podcast. The amount of complication and 28 00:02:15.919 --> 00:02:23.439 how high the Bar of entry was six years ago. Verse now drastically different. 29 00:02:23.840 --> 00:02:30.360 You could do so much with essentially just riverside. I haven't looked that 30 00:02:30.479 --> 00:02:36.080 much into anchor and I the way it started verse. What it is now 31 00:02:36.159 --> 00:02:38.280 is actually quite different, but you look at an integration like this and you 32 00:02:38.360 --> 00:02:46.280 just go it's getting simple, which is really awesome in a number of ways 33 00:02:46.360 --> 00:02:50.680 because you want this to be simple. But also how are we going to 34 00:02:50.680 --> 00:02:53.360 differentiate? And that becomes a big time question as more and more shows are 35 00:02:53.400 --> 00:02:57.199 like hey, it's easy, we should just start a podcast. Has Been 36 00:02:57.240 --> 00:03:02.400 around even before twitter. In fact, if you've read that twitter origin story, 37 00:03:02.439 --> 00:03:07.960 twitter started as a podcasting company first, and I have they had a 38 00:03:07.960 --> 00:03:12.360 different name and I can't remember what it was. It was like Podeo or 39 00:03:12.439 --> 00:03:15.439 podium, I think that's one of those. Are An actual company now, 40 00:03:15.439 --> 00:03:19.120 but it was something like that. And then they created a tool that became 41 00:03:19.240 --> 00:03:23.520 twitter and then they launched they pivoted and launched that. So podcasting's been around 42 00:03:23.599 --> 00:03:28.240 forever Internet age. It's that's the old concept. I remember listening to my 43 00:03:28.240 --> 00:03:31.080 first podcast and when I had my first IPOD, like most people, in 44 00:03:31.120 --> 00:03:37.159 like two thou and six. It's been along two thousand and seven. Maybe 45 00:03:37.240 --> 00:03:39.199 it's been a long time, but it's always been hard, just like you 46 00:03:39.240 --> 00:03:44.800 said, to get all the things done in order to produce one podcast. 47 00:03:44.919 --> 00:03:47.240 I didn't get into the game until two thousand and nineteen actually was a customer, 48 00:03:47.240 --> 00:03:51.520 a sweet fish first and they helped me launch my podcast and then I 49 00:03:51.599 --> 00:03:53.840 think in the process of doing it I learned how to do it. Now 50 00:03:53.879 --> 00:03:57.360 I could launch them multiple podcasts in a day, but I didn't always know 51 00:03:57.400 --> 00:04:00.360 how to do it. Blogging was popular, every other medium was popular. 52 00:04:00.439 --> 00:04:03.520 Now I think podcasting's been on the rise because it's been easier to do slowly, 53 00:04:03.599 --> 00:04:08.840 it's been easier to record and anchor. Anchor actually had a huge breakthrough. 54 00:04:08.960 --> 00:04:11.840 Anchor got became popular one because it was free, but too because you 55 00:04:11.879 --> 00:04:15.360 could record it straight on your phone exact and then push publish. Probably the 56 00:04:15.360 --> 00:04:17.959 easiest way. If you're just doing solo podcast, this is already been possible 57 00:04:18.040 --> 00:04:23.439 through one APP, but it's never been possible to do a guest base show 58 00:04:23.519 --> 00:04:27.839 with just a click button and Bam. And the quality is a big component 59 00:04:27.920 --> 00:04:31.920 of this. I think when people thought of anchor, originally you're thinking, 60 00:04:31.920 --> 00:04:35.920 okay, sweet people can do this, but you're literally recording in your living 61 00:04:36.000 --> 00:04:40.879 room through your phone. The quality isn't quite there and you can still tell 62 00:04:40.920 --> 00:04:46.120 with some shows that are doing this route. It's not produced like enough to 63 00:04:46.160 --> 00:04:48.079 feel like this is the best this is a great option. It's just that 64 00:04:48.120 --> 00:04:53.240 there's a low bar for entry. But with this, the better that the 65 00:04:53.279 --> 00:04:59.199 tools get, when you can go from a live intro all through riverside. 66 00:04:59.279 --> 00:05:02.160 You could go in and trim it, get it all like pretty essentially, 67 00:05:02.240 --> 00:05:04.800 and then you, and we'll talk about this in a minute, but like 68 00:05:04.839 --> 00:05:09.519 the video, could just go straight to spotify, which spotify seems really be 69 00:05:09.519 --> 00:05:15.120 getting into that idea of video podcasting. There's just a lot there that you're 70 00:05:15.120 --> 00:05:18.399 going this has been simplified in a massive way and if we can keep the 71 00:05:18.439 --> 00:05:26.680 production value high while making it really easy for people, it's the way forward. 72 00:05:26.720 --> 00:05:30.480 Absolutely. Again, my question becomes, how are you going to differentiate 73 00:05:30.519 --> 00:05:35.160 then, and how are you going to be, I would say, a 74 00:05:35.160 --> 00:05:40.759 good enough host to keep people's and I'll use a word. Dan Loves attention, 75 00:05:41.319 --> 00:05:46.360 because that's ultimately what this is. It's what radio was all those years 76 00:05:46.360 --> 00:05:50.199 ago, but now it's instead of turning a dial, which they have endless 77 00:05:50.240 --> 00:05:55.600 our ears have endless opportunity to for different types of audio engagement. There's so 78 00:05:55.639 --> 00:06:00.639 many options and it's getting simpler and simpler for more people to join, and 79 00:06:00.720 --> 00:06:04.839 that is the reason for this news headline. Is that it's a big deal 80 00:06:04.879 --> 00:06:10.040 because it's going to like you think podcasting saturated? Now, not even close, 81 00:06:10.439 --> 00:06:13.920 like we're probably have a few million podcasts. Remember there's thirty million youtube 82 00:06:13.959 --> 00:06:17.240 channels, but we're going to get to thirty million podcast so now it's still 83 00:06:17.240 --> 00:06:20.240 early. Time to get out there and figure it out and learn how to 84 00:06:20.319 --> 00:06:23.680 do it. It's also a time for those who are currently into game to 85 00:06:23.800 --> 00:06:27.920 level up their podcast in order to stay competitive, because the tech is going 86 00:06:27.920 --> 00:06:30.199 to make it easier and easier to get out there. Remember when blogging was 87 00:06:30.240 --> 00:06:35.120 like this? You it was. There was a few bloggers that everyone followed, 88 00:06:35.120 --> 00:06:40.279 and then sites like Tumblr or even word press, there's all these. 89 00:06:40.319 --> 00:06:43.560 Okay, now we have a template, you can build your own blog. 90 00:06:43.879 --> 00:06:47.040 Market gets absolutely flooded and now people are going, okay, what's the next 91 00:06:47.079 --> 00:06:51.199 medium? The next medium is podcasting. That movement. You can't even be 92 00:06:51.279 --> 00:06:55.639 an early adopt anymore. That should is saled. But where we are right 93 00:06:55.720 --> 00:07:00.920 now is okay, now everyone can have a podcast and there will still be 94 00:07:00.959 --> 00:07:03.800 podcasts that succeed that haven't been created yet, but they're going to differentiate in 95 00:07:03.800 --> 00:07:10.040 ways and they're going to be thinking through how they make content in much different 96 00:07:10.040 --> 00:07:14.160 ways than what it's been so far and how you gained an audience so far. 97 00:07:15.279 --> 00:07:16.399 What I love it is there's so many ways to win, and that's 98 00:07:16.439 --> 00:07:19.879 probably another topic for another time. I what are those ways to win when 99 00:07:19.879 --> 00:07:24.399 it's so easy just to get start, purely started, but to jump into 100 00:07:24.439 --> 00:07:27.120 the next topic, and this was part of the same announcement, was that 101 00:07:27.240 --> 00:07:32.360 spotify now supports video podcast which it's interestingly, I took a dive like just 102 00:07:32.399 --> 00:07:35.839 a few months ago because I noticed video podcast were on the rise. Everyone's 103 00:07:35.920 --> 00:07:40.560 a lot of people are listening to podcast on Youtube and not even necessarily watching 104 00:07:40.639 --> 00:07:42.879 it, but they have it pulled up on Youtube and they're on a different 105 00:07:42.879 --> 00:07:45.920 tab or something listening and video. I noticed more and more people get into 106 00:07:46.000 --> 00:07:47.920 video. Makes Makes Sense. It's some people like to watch, some people 107 00:07:47.959 --> 00:07:50.800 like to listen. I'm like, Gay, let's do both. Rorety recording, 108 00:07:50.879 --> 00:07:54.199 let's get video footage and make it a podcat make it a video. 109 00:07:54.279 --> 00:07:56.439 But I did a search and it was wicked hard. I'm like, wait, 110 00:07:56.480 --> 00:07:59.720 how do you distribute a video podcast? You can't go do it through 111 00:07:59.800 --> 00:08:03.959 Youtube, and I look through like a dozen or two different hosts and none 112 00:08:03.000 --> 00:08:07.319 of them supported video, so I never spent enough time to figure out, 113 00:08:07.360 --> 00:08:09.079 like, who like of the people doing video? How are they getting their 114 00:08:09.120 --> 00:08:13.040 video feeds to apple and spotify? But now anchor actually supports video and that's 115 00:08:13.079 --> 00:08:16.519 part of the riverside integration. You record cord high quality video on Riverside, 116 00:08:16.600 --> 00:08:20.959 push directly to anchor and I'm sure many podcast host will follow. There's one 117 00:08:22.000 --> 00:08:26.959 caveat in freaking hate spotify for this, but the video only works on spotify. 118 00:08:26.079 --> 00:08:31.959 MMM, of course, freaking spotify. Are you in the Apple Podcast 119 00:08:31.000 --> 00:08:37.720 Guy? I am. I'm a spotify podcast guy. So I love this. 120 00:08:37.879 --> 00:08:41.399 I absolutely love this. I don't and I was going to pose this 121 00:08:41.480 --> 00:08:46.440 question at you, Dan, do you tend to watch podcast does it matter 122 00:08:46.480 --> 00:08:50.279 on the topic, like when are you engaging video in a podcast format? 123 00:08:50.360 --> 00:08:54.399 That's funny. I don't watch podcasts, but I listen. I watch a 124 00:08:54.399 --> 00:08:58.440 lot of people on Youtube who's all the lot of which their content could easily 125 00:08:58.480 --> 00:09:03.120 be on audio only. Yep, so I listened to essentially what could be 126 00:09:03.159 --> 00:09:07.399 podcasts a lot on youtube. I like been Alex hermose primary. I have 127 00:09:07.480 --> 00:09:11.440 his podcast to and I listen to it, but I'm primarily consuming it by 128 00:09:11.480 --> 00:09:15.919 a Youtube Benjamin. I consume him on Tick Tockic. There's a number of 129 00:09:15.960 --> 00:09:18.919 people that I'm just I'm listening to on Youtube and it's mostly because they don't 130 00:09:18.960 --> 00:09:22.919 have a podcast. I would probably like some of them if I knew they 131 00:09:22.960 --> 00:09:26.960 were distributing on podcast. It's more convenient way to listen because of the way 132 00:09:26.080 --> 00:09:31.279 podcast get cued up and you can download it automatically and then on download it 133 00:09:31.480 --> 00:09:37.799 when you finished it. It just takes sense. Yeah, I don't watch 134 00:09:37.799 --> 00:09:39.799 podcasts. I do I agree with what you said. A lot of the 135 00:09:39.799 --> 00:09:45.200 content I'm consuming on Youtube tends to be in the realm of what something I 136 00:09:45.200 --> 00:09:50.759 could have consumed in a podcast format. But podcasting for me is so easy 137 00:09:50.799 --> 00:09:54.759 to take with you. This is why I like video specific can't speak for 138 00:09:54.799 --> 00:09:58.519 apple, but the way that it works on spotify specifically that when I play 139 00:09:58.559 --> 00:10:03.440 it, if it's up on my full screen, the video showing, but 140 00:10:03.559 --> 00:10:07.879 it's so seamless that as soon as that's gone it's just audio and so the 141 00:10:07.879 --> 00:10:11.360 back in the fourth closing of my phone doesn't pause it. There's no it's 142 00:10:11.559 --> 00:10:18.440 extremely seamless through spotify and so I appreciate that. But even with the show. 143 00:10:18.519 --> 00:10:22.519 Like I know Rogan. He was like the first to do video through 144 00:10:22.559 --> 00:10:26.000 spotify, and it's fun like to be able to see the studio. But 145 00:10:26.039 --> 00:10:28.799 other than that, at the beginning of the show I'm not watching it. 146 00:10:28.679 --> 00:10:33.279 I'm it's just not and they're cutting that and they're putting it on ticktock and 147 00:10:33.320 --> 00:10:37.840 they're putting it on youtube and I enjoyed those clips over there and that's where 148 00:10:37.879 --> 00:10:41.000 I do think there's a value add for podcasters. Is You mind as well? 149 00:10:41.000 --> 00:10:43.639 We're already here at Dan said might as well get the video, you 150 00:10:43.759 --> 00:10:48.159 might as well you do something like this because it's available to you and now 151 00:10:48.200 --> 00:10:52.240 you have this long form video content that can be used elsewhere in splices. 152 00:10:52.320 --> 00:10:58.519 But I don't imagine that most people are consuming this by just going to youtube 153 00:10:58.559 --> 00:11:03.639 consistence. Those that are in the podcast frame of mind, I say, 154 00:11:03.679 --> 00:11:07.440 but it's just a it's an interesting play and again how simple it is, 155 00:11:07.639 --> 00:11:13.240 and then you add video. It's fun time to be a podcaster. I 156 00:11:13.240 --> 00:11:16.039 think if you're in podcasting you should start thinking about how to add video, 157 00:11:16.120 --> 00:11:18.399 not just so you can get an extra distribution channel through youtube, but I 158 00:11:18.399 --> 00:11:24.480 think as more podcasting platform support video viewing I think it'll just be like you 159 00:11:24.519 --> 00:11:28.360 can add in visual elements when you need to. Most of the time you 160 00:11:28.399 --> 00:11:31.360 can just talk about somes, but sometimes the pictures worth a thousand words. 161 00:11:31.360 --> 00:11:33.679 And what if you were viewing an audio something? That's then you have to 162 00:11:33.720 --> 00:11:35.440 describe it. It doesn't quite do it justice. And if it's easy for 163 00:11:35.480 --> 00:11:37.480 me to just pull it up and take a look at what you're talking about 164 00:11:37.519 --> 00:11:43.000 real quick because I'm on a run or something and sometimes I just have it 165 00:11:43.039 --> 00:11:45.679 open on my phone as I'm doing dishes, I glance at every once in 166 00:11:45.720 --> 00:11:48.720 a while to see the reaction that they're giving because something drumatic happened, if 167 00:11:48.720 --> 00:11:52.000 it's Joe Rogun or something. Yeah, but I think it's going in that 168 00:11:52.039 --> 00:11:56.840 direction and I would start focusing on a video game, even if only just 169 00:11:56.879 --> 00:12:01.679 for Youtube, because Youtube is taking over more and more casting and it's the 170 00:12:01.759 --> 00:12:03.399 date as really starting to go in that direction. The more that Tick Tock 171 00:12:03.600 --> 00:12:07.799 rises, the more that having the video does matter, which you and I 172 00:12:07.840 --> 00:12:11.879 have had this kind of like conversation debate, and beat Ab podcasting specifically, 173 00:12:11.919 --> 00:12:18.200 where it does the video from your podcast work. We don't need to rehash 174 00:12:18.320 --> 00:12:22.039 all of that, but I do think it's interesting if you can have the 175 00:12:22.120 --> 00:12:26.960 video. Not only is it good on Youtube, but tick tock is what 176 00:12:26.000 --> 00:12:28.720 a lot of people are thinking about as well as for us, she's really 177 00:12:28.799 --> 00:12:35.360 short form video content that then you can repurpose. Next in the news is 178 00:12:35.399 --> 00:12:41.960 an article that came from the morning brew about the perfect length for a podcast 179 00:12:41.200 --> 00:12:48.679 placement add so they had some conclusions in the article, but I wanted to 180 00:12:48.720 --> 00:12:52.480 ask throat to you, Benji, like how long is too long, or 181 00:12:52.639 --> 00:12:54.039 do you find that has to be a certain length for you to even remember 182 00:12:54.080 --> 00:12:58.200 that there was an ad there? I am the guy that, when the 183 00:12:58.240 --> 00:13:03.840 ad comes on, I'm hitting fifteen second forward consistently, like I know the 184 00:13:03.879 --> 00:13:07.679 podcast that I listen to the most, I know where your ads are placed 185 00:13:07.679 --> 00:13:13.440 and I'm skipping them all the time. So to me, what I found 186 00:13:13.559 --> 00:13:18.159 interesting about this article is it to go long, go over a minute and 187 00:13:18.000 --> 00:13:24.440 whenever possible, that you find that you can get impact from length, which 188 00:13:24.440 --> 00:13:28.279 I'm like, okay, it's a little I don't know how people are engaging 189 00:13:28.320 --> 00:13:31.879 with that. If they're just once they're playing a podcast, they forget about 190 00:13:31.919 --> 00:13:33.919 and they don't skip and then you're a minute in and you've had am this 191 00:13:35.080 --> 00:13:43.519 long ad listened to. Personally, I think the best way forward, and 192 00:13:43.519 --> 00:13:46.399 they mentioned this at the end of the article so I'll just read it here, 193 00:13:46.519 --> 00:13:50.480 is to do a sponsored branded segment. So they say it's worth noting 194 00:13:50.559 --> 00:13:56.919 that these formats aren't the only options. Advertisers can run branded SAG segments, 195 00:13:56.919 --> 00:14:01.799 sponsor entire episodes or shows or even start podcasts of their own. And they 196 00:14:01.840 --> 00:14:07.879 talk about how macy's ran almost a ten minute branded segment on a show and 197 00:14:07.919 --> 00:14:11.960 it was listened like seventy seven percent listen through rate. Okay, the idea 198 00:14:13.200 --> 00:14:16.960 is to me. I I listen to a podcast, these fantasy football guys 199 00:14:18.000 --> 00:14:22.159 and they have a second show for when football season isn't happening called a spit 200 00:14:22.200 --> 00:14:28.200 ballers, and head and shoulders shampoo sponsors their show and the only they're one 201 00:14:28.240 --> 00:14:33.919 of the only advertisers I can remember, because they sponsor a specific recurring segment 202 00:14:33.919 --> 00:14:41.440 weekly, and so the hosts are doing at essentially like a ten second almost 203 00:14:41.480 --> 00:14:46.559 a one sentence add read at the top and the segment is branded around the 204 00:14:46.559 --> 00:14:50.919 shampoo and something about what the shampoo does and then they get to read the 205 00:14:50.919 --> 00:14:54.519 exact same sentence at the end of the segment, but the content in the 206 00:14:54.559 --> 00:14:58.399 Filler I still want to hear and consume. So it's almost like thinking about 207 00:14:58.399 --> 00:15:05.799 TV and thinking about in sports how different segments are. We're different parts of 208 00:15:05.840 --> 00:15:11.000 the entire broadcast or sponsored by companies. You can do that in podcasting and 209 00:15:11.039 --> 00:15:15.679 I think you'll see some pretty great results. It's also the same as like 210 00:15:15.720 --> 00:15:18.360 a mid roll ad. In mid roll ads tend to be the the best 211 00:15:18.399 --> 00:15:24.080 performing if you look at the stats. Pre Roll is potentially great, but 212 00:15:24.200 --> 00:15:28.240 mid roll is like you're safe bet. So that's my initial thoughts. Dan. 213 00:15:28.320 --> 00:15:33.399 I don't know what you would add on that. I've purchased a number 214 00:15:33.480 --> 00:15:37.080 of things from host recommendations Nice, but it has to come directly from the 215 00:15:37.080 --> 00:15:39.600 host exactly. If the host is the line of that, I trust. 216 00:15:39.639 --> 00:15:41.639 Then I listened to and they're like, Oh, and for today sponsor is 217 00:15:41.679 --> 00:15:45.159 I use them all the time. They're freaking fantastic. In fact, I 218 00:15:45.200 --> 00:15:46.840 just used it the other day and well, my kid did. This happened 219 00:15:46.879 --> 00:15:50.320 and it was it would work like a charm. Why are you waiting? 220 00:15:50.440 --> 00:15:54.120 Go and do it? I'm like those ones freaking get me, especially if 221 00:15:54.159 --> 00:15:56.120 I'm like but they literally can't tip me over, and they have multiple times. 222 00:15:56.159 --> 00:15:58.600 But if it's not a host read ad, I'm done and it. 223 00:15:58.919 --> 00:16:03.240 But I get really mad if it's, if it's more than thirty seconds, 224 00:16:03.240 --> 00:16:06.879 I'm just like then I am searching for the skip button. I can tolerate 225 00:16:06.879 --> 00:16:11.840 it for about thirty seconds Max. So the longer brand plays, but really, 226 00:16:11.879 --> 00:16:15.720 if you're going ten minutes, it's like a branded content kind of a 227 00:16:15.799 --> 00:16:18.919 thing and it's just different exactly. There's a way talk to you that, 228 00:16:18.000 --> 00:16:22.080 I think. But I think thirty seconds is what I respect, even if 229 00:16:22.120 --> 00:16:25.919 it's has to happen multiple times because they're a big show and they're trying to 230 00:16:25.960 --> 00:16:29.399 monetize and they have a pre amid, maybe a couple meds if it's a 231 00:16:29.440 --> 00:16:32.960 really long show, and then a post. I'm like, I get it, 232 00:16:33.039 --> 00:16:37.440 but I'm on spotify. Tim Ferris has because he outeloads like the first 233 00:16:37.440 --> 00:16:41.080 five to six minutes of his podcast with ads, and so naturally I've just 234 00:16:41.159 --> 00:16:45.120 learned to skip the first five minutes. Yep, Yep. On spotify, 235 00:16:45.159 --> 00:16:48.919 the way they do adds is so, for instance, Bill Simmons, he 236 00:16:49.480 --> 00:16:53.200 on the front end of his show when his ads run. It's puts up 237 00:16:53.240 --> 00:16:57.159 the ad on your screen and you can tap it to go to the website. 238 00:16:57.200 --> 00:17:00.639 What's interesting about that is it's great for the advertiser in the fact like 239 00:17:00.679 --> 00:17:03.759 they get to put an image in front of the listener that they can tap 240 00:17:03.799 --> 00:17:07.279 on and go to a website. But what's counterintuitive is, let's say it's 241 00:17:07.279 --> 00:17:11.079 a thirty second add and this is just my brain who doesn't like advertising really. 242 00:17:11.119 --> 00:17:15.680 So I'm going I know it's to fifteen skip, fifteen second skips, 243 00:17:15.920 --> 00:17:21.640 and I also know that it's going to take me out essentially of the typical 244 00:17:21.720 --> 00:17:26.680 podcast like linear line. So if I skip this, it changes the album 245 00:17:26.839 --> 00:17:30.000 art in a sense to the ad and I know exactly how far I need 246 00:17:30.000 --> 00:17:33.680 to skip because then that's gone. It takes me back to Bill Simmons logo. 247 00:17:33.759 --> 00:17:41.559 So you just it's you have to be thinking about being the listener there. 248 00:17:41.640 --> 00:17:45.960 There for the content, and podcasting is different than like TV, where 249 00:17:45.960 --> 00:17:48.519 I go to TV knowing that ads are part of the equation. When I 250 00:17:48.519 --> 00:17:52.400 come to podcasting I know I can skip. So if I can really get 251 00:17:52.400 --> 00:17:59.680 baked into the show by being a branded segment that I know the listeners will 252 00:17:59.680 --> 00:18:03.200 still engage with that segment, and my name is being going back to what 253 00:18:03.240 --> 00:18:07.480 you said, Dan, it's mentioned multiple times that to me seems like gold, 254 00:18:07.480 --> 00:18:11.079 like why wouldn't you want to be that where people are like, I 255 00:18:11.079 --> 00:18:14.119 actually really enjoy that segment. Oh Yeah, and it's sponsored by head and 256 00:18:14.160 --> 00:18:21.519 shoulders. So, BDB podcast, you should probably be running ads. I 257 00:18:21.559 --> 00:18:25.119 think it really helps your show, especially if you do an artful and tasteful 258 00:18:25.119 --> 00:18:29.960 while you're working with people that you actually work with, like you're their customers 259 00:18:29.960 --> 00:18:32.799 and you could say hey, it, we work for a company and we 260 00:18:32.880 --> 00:18:34.240 use this all the time. It's fantastic. Check it out. If you 261 00:18:34.279 --> 00:18:37.759 have relevant things, it only makes the show better if you're doing in a 262 00:18:37.759 --> 00:18:41.759 tasteful way. If you think about it, youtubers may call channels doing nothing 263 00:18:41.759 --> 00:18:45.559 but product reviews, and it's entertaining. Why? Because people want to know 264 00:18:45.599 --> 00:18:48.039 about the new stuff, they want to know about ways they can be helped. 265 00:18:48.240 --> 00:18:52.000 People actually like getting ads if the ads done in a way that's most 266 00:18:52.000 --> 00:19:00.720 helpful to the audience. So moving on, we have the member highlight for 267 00:19:00.759 --> 00:19:06.200 the week and that is from a podcast called raising problem solvers and it is 268 00:19:06.240 --> 00:19:11.720 from the art of problem solvingcom. Now they're trying to reach parents of gift, 269 00:19:11.880 --> 00:19:15.880 not gifted but kids that are trying to like really push their MAS skills. 270 00:19:15.880 --> 00:19:18.480 But they're also going to be to be two educators and different be to 271 00:19:18.519 --> 00:19:22.200 be context. So it's almost like a consumer podcast. It's mixed B TOCBDB 272 00:19:22.319 --> 00:19:27.039 play. But he does something in the podcast that I loved. Eric is 273 00:19:27.079 --> 00:19:30.519 the host of the show and he brings his dog or on to every episode 274 00:19:30.559 --> 00:19:33.519 in the very beginnings and he asked her a really basic question. That's the 275 00:19:33.599 --> 00:19:37.680 premise, the topic for the show. He's a sweetheart. Tell me, 276 00:19:37.799 --> 00:19:41.160 what do you think about this? And then she gets on the microphone and 277 00:19:41.200 --> 00:19:45.319 gives an answer and she's probably going to be like seven or eight years old 278 00:19:45.359 --> 00:19:48.960 or something, and her answers are always really interesting and it sets up the 279 00:19:48.960 --> 00:19:52.240 conversation for the show in a way that just is really sweet but at the 280 00:19:52.240 --> 00:19:57.119 same time really sets the tone for the conversation, because then eric takes over 281 00:19:57.160 --> 00:20:02.119 and gives a narration for the conversation after her answer, and I just thought 282 00:20:02.160 --> 00:20:04.680 it was a really interesting way thing that he did with his podcast that I 283 00:20:04.680 --> 00:20:07.119 think one you should check out and think about how you might be able to 284 00:20:07.160 --> 00:20:11.279 change up the intro of your podcast. We're going to be talking about intro 285 00:20:11.359 --> 00:20:15.000 a little bit later on in my club as we are developing our own thinking 286 00:20:15.039 --> 00:20:19.559 on intros. But think about how you can lead into your intro in a 287 00:20:19.599 --> 00:20:26.559 slightly different way, maybe with different pieces from different people, the customers, 288 00:20:26.640 --> 00:20:30.200 the consumers behind your customers. Where can you break in other voices that might 289 00:20:30.240 --> 00:20:33.519 be able to lead into your intro? So check out raising problem solvers the 290 00:20:33.519 --> 00:20:37.599 PODCAST. I'll link it to in the show notes. Really interesting way to 291 00:20:37.599 --> 00:20:41.440 start a podcast. Moving on to the question segment, we have two main 292 00:20:41.519 --> 00:20:45.559 questions that we're going into, starting with how can I become a guest on 293 00:20:45.599 --> 00:20:51.680 other people shows? Is a frequent question I hear from B Tob podcasters. 294 00:20:52.359 --> 00:20:55.960 Any thoughts on that? Benjie? I would immediately throw back to you because 295 00:20:56.000 --> 00:20:59.680 I know this is something you're thinking about right now and I've been pitched, 296 00:20:59.720 --> 00:21:04.400 so we can talk about that. But I'd like your perspective first. Now 297 00:21:04.400 --> 00:21:08.000 I've been in your seat before where I was hosting a lot of bb growth 298 00:21:08.000 --> 00:21:15.200 episodes, and it seems like you frequently get pitches and ninety nine percent of 299 00:21:15.240 --> 00:21:18.759 them you're like. Not only do you say no, but you like you 300 00:21:18.759 --> 00:21:22.160 think negatively of that person. Yeah, you're frustrate. You like they went 301 00:21:22.200 --> 00:21:26.640 down a few points in your book, mostly because you've never seen them before. 302 00:21:26.680 --> 00:21:30.000 So your first interaction is, Hey, saw that you run a podcast. 303 00:21:30.160 --> 00:21:33.680 I think I would be great for your audience. Here's my qualifications. 304 00:21:33.720 --> 00:21:38.000 I would talk about this. What do you think? They're pitching it to 305 00:21:38.039 --> 00:21:41.400 you as if it's a value to you, as if they're like God's gift 306 00:21:41.519 --> 00:21:45.880 to your podcast, and you're like no, every once in a while somebody 307 00:21:45.880 --> 00:21:51.599 gets really lucky and it's just because I happen to be covering that topic soon 308 00:21:51.920 --> 00:21:55.880 and I'm looking for people on it. But it's rare, super rare. 309 00:21:55.920 --> 00:21:57.759 So I can say a few things that have gone well for me for pitching 310 00:21:57.759 --> 00:22:00.799 other people, but generally this is the best practice. In fact, there's 311 00:22:00.839 --> 00:22:06.519 a there's a another agency we work with often a refer people to on how 312 00:22:06.519 --> 00:22:10.440 to get on podcast. It's called speak on podcastscom. They're great at this. 313 00:22:10.440 --> 00:22:12.799 So you can hire someone to do this for you, but generally the 314 00:22:12.839 --> 00:22:15.440 best thing you could do is actually build a bit of a relationship with the 315 00:22:15.480 --> 00:22:19.519 host and then find out what their agenda is for the podcast and then reverse 316 00:22:19.559 --> 00:22:23.079 engineer what you can speak to to meet that agenda, but it takes a 317 00:22:23.079 --> 00:22:26.400 Freakin ton of time, which is why people hire people like speak on podcast 318 00:22:26.480 --> 00:22:29.599 in order to help them do it. And it's not cheat because of the 319 00:22:29.640 --> 00:22:32.559 amount of time it takes to build a relationship. But it is possible, 320 00:22:32.559 --> 00:22:37.880 and that's probably the best way that I've seen, is to find the host, 321 00:22:37.039 --> 00:22:41.640 find them what act, whatever social platform they're currently on, build a 322 00:22:41.640 --> 00:22:47.279 relationship by getting conversations, going to talk about what they're posting about and then 323 00:22:47.400 --> 00:22:49.920 listen to some episodes and then you can make a pitch to be on their 324 00:22:49.960 --> 00:22:53.920 show, especially if you have a different angle to what they're currently talking about 325 00:22:55.039 --> 00:22:59.160 or know what their next things about. Being able to recommend yourself in there 326 00:22:59.200 --> 00:23:03.880 is a possible way to do it. That's probably the least will lead to 327 00:23:03.920 --> 00:23:07.680 the highest amount of success, especially if it's not a like a mega show 328 00:23:07.720 --> 00:23:11.359 like Gary V. you'll never be on because it's just too hard to get 329 00:23:11.400 --> 00:23:14.240 on. You have to be a celebrity already, but there's plenty of other 330 00:23:14.240 --> 00:23:17.279 shows, especially to be to be context that will gladly take you if you 331 00:23:17.359 --> 00:23:19.920 are at the right place at the right time. Yeah, that's a big 332 00:23:19.960 --> 00:23:25.480 component of this to me, is if you come in guns blazing. This 333 00:23:25.559 --> 00:23:30.680 is why I'm God's gift to your podcast. It just doesn't it lacks the 334 00:23:30.720 --> 00:23:36.160 tone necessary to land you on a show. Versus if you could come in, 335 00:23:36.240 --> 00:23:42.039 and I'm not talking about crappy personalization where like you personalize the first sentence 336 00:23:42.079 --> 00:23:47.839 and happen to mention the name of the show and what one of the titles 337 00:23:47.839 --> 00:23:49.680 of the last few episodes, where that is not what I'm talking about here, 338 00:23:49.680 --> 00:23:53.319 but if you were to like deeply listen to a few and prove that 339 00:23:53.359 --> 00:23:59.759 out, or comment on the publishing of a few episodes, go and tell 340 00:23:59.839 --> 00:24:03.039 me what you liked. There's a way to do that. If you're going 341 00:24:03.079 --> 00:24:07.720 to come in cold, you might as well come in cold completely and like 342 00:24:07.279 --> 00:24:15.920 come go into the email and allow your introduction to explain why you're pitching podcasts. 343 00:24:15.079 --> 00:24:18.000 Why are you like, just very briefly, I'm reaching out to a 344 00:24:18.039 --> 00:24:22.480 few podcast because recently I did this thing that I think could be a value 345 00:24:22.519 --> 00:24:26.279 to your audience, because I know that they do blank. That's better to 346 00:24:26.319 --> 00:24:30.960 me than the half baked personalization. But I do think having relationship obviously always 347 00:24:30.960 --> 00:24:36.440 going to be optimal is your best bet, and then pitching shows that aren't 348 00:24:36.440 --> 00:24:41.720 in the top hundred, go further down the list, find some that maybe 349 00:24:41.799 --> 00:24:45.440 our prove you're worth on those shows and then you have some in your on 350 00:24:45.480 --> 00:24:51.559 your resume essentially, and hopefully those go well enough that then it allows that 351 00:24:51.920 --> 00:24:56.119 flywheel to start moving and gaining momentum. But I have said yes. I 352 00:24:56.160 --> 00:24:57.359 have said Yes to some pictures for me to be growth. I will say 353 00:24:57.400 --> 00:25:00.039 that. And most of them go one of the two ways. Either they 354 00:25:00.079 --> 00:25:03.839 know they're very hyper personalized or it wasn't at all, but they tell me 355 00:25:03.960 --> 00:25:11.000 why they're reaching out. Two shows ways to when. A few other like 356 00:25:11.119 --> 00:25:15.400 subquestions I get around this topic are that websites where you can swap shows worth 357 00:25:15.480 --> 00:25:19.720 it or essentially list yourself as a speaker and let the podcast list their podcast 358 00:25:19.839 --> 00:25:23.519 for incoming speakers. None of them are worth it. Let me just save 359 00:25:23.599 --> 00:25:26.000 you the time. Don't do it. It's not a great way to get 360 00:25:26.039 --> 00:25:30.440 on podcast. If those podcasts let you on, they're probably trash with zero 361 00:25:30.480 --> 00:25:33.200 audience, and I never list our podcast on those sites because everybody going and 362 00:25:33.720 --> 00:25:37.400 incoming as just not I would never take them in as that's a guest. 363 00:25:37.519 --> 00:25:41.279 So just save yourself the time at least just do the relationship building. One. 364 00:25:41.440 --> 00:25:47.799 The gold standard that Chris Walker uses is to not ask anybody and just 365 00:25:47.880 --> 00:25:52.799 publish in for edge. Just be so active on a social media site like 366 00:25:52.839 --> 00:25:56.240 Linkedin, twitter, Youtube, something where you're posting amazing content that draws people 367 00:25:56.359 --> 00:26:00.039 to you. Anytime I've been a guest on the show it's because I've been 368 00:26:00.079 --> 00:26:03.279 asked. I've never actually pitched someone to be a guest on a podcast yet, 369 00:26:03.319 --> 00:26:06.720 though I'd like to, because again, like everybody, it's great to 370 00:26:06.720 --> 00:26:11.319 be featured as a guest. But that's the easy that's the gold standard. 371 00:26:11.319 --> 00:26:15.480 Be So interesting and have something so good and so helpful that people are coming 372 00:26:15.519 --> 00:26:18.559 to you and being like, Oh, I'd love to interview about and I've 373 00:26:18.640 --> 00:26:22.079 chased after many authors and people that have something going, including Chris Wonger, 374 00:26:22.359 --> 00:26:26.920 to be on BB growth and, if my own attention podcast. So that's 375 00:26:26.960 --> 00:26:30.039 the best way to go. But again, there's other things you can do 376 00:26:30.039 --> 00:26:33.920 in addition to that to get on more podcast now moving on to the second 377 00:26:34.000 --> 00:26:40.200 question. How much preparation research do you do leading up to recording a podcast 378 00:26:40.240 --> 00:26:44.119 episode with a guest was a recent topic in the MIC club group on Linkedin, 379 00:26:44.200 --> 00:26:45.960 which, if you're listening to this you're not part of that group. 380 00:26:45.000 --> 00:26:48.559 You need to go find it. I'll make a short link a join my 381 00:26:48.759 --> 00:26:52.799 Clubcom linkedin and it'll send you right to the group page to be in the 382 00:26:52.839 --> 00:26:56.319 group. But this question comes from there and this is interesting. So I 383 00:26:56.319 --> 00:26:59.880 think we talked about this in BDB growth but not here on my club. 384 00:27:00.039 --> 00:27:04.400 So I'm mentioning. How much preparation do you put into preparing? I will 385 00:27:04.480 --> 00:27:10.960 say only for me personally, I do not like this question if you're trying 386 00:27:10.960 --> 00:27:14.319 to give a blanket answer, because everyone's going to be different. I find 387 00:27:14.359 --> 00:27:18.559 it interesting sometimes people have the opinion that if they're more wellknown, you do 388 00:27:18.640 --> 00:27:25.200 more research. Sometimes that's just not too true, because you could listen to 389 00:27:25.440 --> 00:27:30.200 a couple PODCASTS, a couple content pieces that they've put out and you can 390 00:27:30.279 --> 00:27:32.680 find a section that you go oh, that's really good and I want to 391 00:27:32.680 --> 00:27:34.839 talk about that. You have endless options of what to talk to this person 392 00:27:34.880 --> 00:27:38.039 about because they've been featured. So do you want to make it unique and 393 00:27:38.200 --> 00:27:41.440 somehow stand out amongst the noise? Yeah, but I find you have so 394 00:27:41.559 --> 00:27:45.880 much content to choose from that you don't have to dig quite as hard. 395 00:27:45.000 --> 00:27:49.279 Versus if I'm having to really think through my questions, because maybe this person 396 00:27:49.359 --> 00:27:53.880 hasn't been in the spotlight as often, I find myself prepping those questions more 397 00:27:53.920 --> 00:27:59.000 intentionally. I find myself hosting the pre interview and I usually go back and 398 00:27:59.039 --> 00:28:03.880 I listen to the pre interview again into speed and I'm taking notes and I'm 399 00:28:03.920 --> 00:28:07.880 rewinding more off and trying to understand what what they meant by something they said. 400 00:28:07.920 --> 00:28:11.160 And a lot of times they're not as trained in front of a camera 401 00:28:11.240 --> 00:28:15.480 or in front of a microphone, so they're more nervous thinking about it much 402 00:28:15.519 --> 00:28:18.720 differently. I also do interviews with authors, and authors know their content a 403 00:28:19.079 --> 00:28:25.720 majority of the time fairly well, and so in that experience they have a 404 00:28:25.799 --> 00:28:30.160 book that we're drawing from, which means preparation. I can almost predict it's. 405 00:28:30.200 --> 00:28:33.680 My preparation for talking to an author is thirty to sixty minutes because I'm 406 00:28:33.680 --> 00:28:36.359 going to take their concepts, I'm going to take their content, I'm going 407 00:28:36.400 --> 00:28:41.839 to use quotes like I can pull copy paste. That's a much different process 408 00:28:41.880 --> 00:28:45.640 than going okay, this person doesn't do anything publicly, but they're just a 409 00:28:45.720 --> 00:28:49.319 CMO for this company and it's fantastic to have you on the show, but 410 00:28:49.359 --> 00:28:52.880 I don't know what to pull from. So I might be looking at your 411 00:28:52.920 --> 00:28:57.000 website enough. So to me I don't want to go much above an hour 412 00:28:57.039 --> 00:29:02.880 just because I'm doing so many of these, but that would I would say 413 00:29:03.920 --> 00:29:07.519 it's a little bit different person to person, in somewhere in that ballpark range. 414 00:29:07.519 --> 00:29:11.359 What about you, Dan? It's fun. I usually like to give 415 00:29:11.400 --> 00:29:15.240 a really precise answer rather than it depends, because it depends as never, 416 00:29:15.279 --> 00:29:21.400 never a good answer. But just to illustrate that it's there's so many ways 417 00:29:21.440 --> 00:29:23.440 to win, and let's be thankful for it that there's not just one right 418 00:29:23.480 --> 00:29:26.039 answer. And this could be a point of differentiation for your show. Whether 419 00:29:26.079 --> 00:29:30.680 you prepare not at is like almost zero, or you prepare hours and hour 420 00:29:30.799 --> 00:29:33.640 is like ten hours into a show. To give the two extremes, you 421 00:29:33.680 --> 00:29:37.519 have Joe Rogan on one end, who prepares, but let's his long interviews 422 00:29:37.559 --> 00:29:40.920 unpack the most interesting points that he could then turn into small clips. If 423 00:29:40.920 --> 00:29:44.440 you want to see what that not like, letting less prepared what that looks 424 00:29:44.480 --> 00:29:47.680 like, and I'm sure he actually prepares some I can't imagine he's coming off 425 00:29:47.720 --> 00:29:51.640 blind, but he uses a long interview in order to uncover the topics and 426 00:29:51.640 --> 00:29:53.440 gives it breathing space. Versus, on the other hand, you have Sean 427 00:29:53.519 --> 00:30:00.720 Evans of hot ones, who's fantastic asking well research questions he's asked of celebrities 428 00:30:00.720 --> 00:30:03.559 that nobody else has asked them because he's done so much more homework than any 429 00:30:03.559 --> 00:30:08.079 other interviewer. Where you don't want or probably be, and there's I say, 430 00:30:08.079 --> 00:30:11.640 don't be in the middle, but there's even so many different, different 431 00:30:11.640 --> 00:30:14.200 ways to do it. Instead of doing research, you do a long pre 432 00:30:14.279 --> 00:30:18.039 interview to find the right topics and because of the angle of your show you're 433 00:30:18.039 --> 00:30:19.720 going to be able to pull out something different than what everybody else is asking 434 00:30:19.759 --> 00:30:25.480 because, well, everybody's asking Chris Walker about demand Jin. Your show might 435 00:30:25.519 --> 00:30:32.759 be about customer experience for agencies. Bam, you think Kress has been asked 436 00:30:32.799 --> 00:30:36.519 a lot of about things about customer experience at an agency level, and then 437 00:30:36.559 --> 00:30:40.400 that would be interesting, right, because everybody's asking them about demand jen over 438 00:30:40.519 --> 00:30:42.839 on his backstory, but not from that angle. So the angle of your 439 00:30:42.839 --> 00:30:45.640 show might be able to draw something interesting. You might not need a lot 440 00:30:45.680 --> 00:30:49.160 more time. You might actually use the same ten questions every time because you're 441 00:30:49.200 --> 00:30:52.279 the angle of your shows. So you Nique, it's still get to be 442 00:30:52.319 --> 00:30:55.599 good. So there's so many ways to win. The question is, does 443 00:30:55.640 --> 00:31:00.079 your show sound like everybody else's? And that's a different problem. But know 444 00:31:00.240 --> 00:31:03.799 that how much you prepare could be one of the differentiating factors for your show. 445 00:31:03.839 --> 00:31:08.400 I love this about my club and about forming a community around be to 446 00:31:08.440 --> 00:31:15.839 be podcasting is that it should be more about what we're learning than telling you 447 00:31:15.000 --> 00:31:19.440 and prescribing to you the exact thing you should do. There is not a 448 00:31:19.519 --> 00:31:25.519 minute's limit you should put on it. This isn't it depends answer. It's 449 00:31:25.559 --> 00:31:26.880 a cope. This is what a good coach would do, is they would 450 00:31:26.920 --> 00:31:33.000 ask some follow up questions that then facilitate you thinking about the show you're trying 451 00:31:33.039 --> 00:31:36.440 to create. Because, Dan, I like that phrase you use, that 452 00:31:36.519 --> 00:31:41.119 there's so many ways to win. In truth, it could be cool if 453 00:31:41.119 --> 00:31:45.440 you set a time limit for yourself and said I'm going in with whatever I 454 00:31:45.440 --> 00:31:51.039 can create in thirty minutes and you could tell people that this is just like. 455 00:31:51.160 --> 00:31:55.640 That's a way that I do my research. But to you. It's 456 00:31:55.640 --> 00:32:00.799 really knowing your why and what you're centering a podcast around and allowing yourself. 457 00:32:00.839 --> 00:32:06.480 There's also people that just do research way faster than me, pretty slow on 458 00:32:06.599 --> 00:32:09.319 the way that I do my research. So I need more time, not 459 00:32:09.359 --> 00:32:15.079 because I'm necessarily doing better research, but just because I get distracted. So 460 00:32:15.519 --> 00:32:22.839 that's a big component as well. Hopefully this show is giving you ideas of 461 00:32:22.920 --> 00:32:25.440 things you can go and test with your own podcast, because I don't believe, 462 00:32:25.480 --> 00:32:30.079 I don't believe in the idea of launching a perfect podcast. The best 463 00:32:30.119 --> 00:32:34.680 content channels and the channels that have the most success are usually ones that have 464 00:32:34.759 --> 00:32:38.480 evolved and had time to try out different things over time. I've I went 465 00:32:38.519 --> 00:32:45.119 and I'm still surveying the top fifty marketing podcast and they're all shows that have 466 00:32:45.160 --> 00:32:50.720 grown from something that used to be rough and have grown to be hit just 467 00:32:50.799 --> 00:32:53.599 the right have just the mind of right amount of residents with their audience and 468 00:32:53.759 --> 00:32:57.480 the length and the host and the way they speak to and the way they 469 00:32:57.519 --> 00:33:00.240 speak to it at the types of guests they pick. All of those things 470 00:33:00.240 --> 00:33:04.720 have been honed in because they've experimented and tried out different things. So hopefully 471 00:33:04.799 --> 00:33:08.000 in covering the news, highlighting members and answering these questions with a variety of 472 00:33:08.039 --> 00:33:12.440 answers. There's something for you to take away from the podcast in order to 473 00:33:12.440 --> 00:33:17.960 try and make your podcast one that can be your audience's favorite show. So, 474 00:33:19.079 --> 00:33:22.720 until next week, we're going to sign off and again check us out 475 00:33:22.759 --> 00:33:27.000 on Linkedin. We just lunked launched that linkedin group last week, so go 476 00:33:27.039 --> 00:33:30.839 to join, join my Clubcom Linkedin to be part of the group if you're 477 00:33:30.880 --> 00:33:39.279 not already by everybody, welcome back to another episode of MC Club. I'm 478 00:33:39.359 --> 00:33:44.640 Dan Sanchez and I'm here with Benji block from sweet fish media, and we're 479 00:33:44.640 --> 00:33:49.759 going to be covering news, a member highlight and questions from the BDB podcasting 480 00:33:49.799 --> 00:33:55.079 community, and I'm excited this week. This there major announcement happened last it 481 00:33:55.200 --> 00:34:00.519 was like one of those small steps that a company took that was like a 482 00:34:00.519 --> 00:34:04.559 big step for the industry, something I've been waiting for probably over two years, 483 00:34:04.559 --> 00:34:07.920 ever since I've started working for this week fish coming, and it finally 484 00:34:07.039 --> 00:34:10.960 dropped today, or at least the first iteration of it, and that is 485 00:34:12.000 --> 00:34:17.639 the spotify riverside announcement. So a press release was put out from both Riverside, 486 00:34:17.679 --> 00:34:22.480 a podcast recording platform they're actually using to record this very podcast, and 487 00:34:22.719 --> 00:34:29.840 anchor, which is the podcast hosting company of spotify, making a deep integra 488 00:34:30.000 --> 00:34:35.239 sho between the two to make it easy to record straight on Riverside, which 489 00:34:35.280 --> 00:34:38.639 you can edit a little bit in riverside and then push directly to anchor to 490 00:34:38.679 --> 00:34:45.360 then publish. It's a small step because technically it's just an integration, it's 491 00:34:45.360 --> 00:34:49.159 some information passing through to another company where it can be published. But it's 492 00:34:49.199 --> 00:34:54.119 a huge step and that it's just become easy to capture high quality video and 493 00:34:54.159 --> 00:34:59.039 audio and then, with a click of a button, it's out, no 494 00:34:59.199 --> 00:35:02.039 downloading or uploading required. That was always a big step and a hurdle for 495 00:35:02.119 --> 00:35:06.880 podcasting is the amount of media you have to move around. What do you 496 00:35:06.880 --> 00:35:08.760 think about it? I don't know when you started podcasting, Dan, but 497 00:35:08.840 --> 00:35:14.079 the first thing I thought of was six years ago when I recorded my first 498 00:35:14.119 --> 00:35:20.039 episode sitting in a closet underneath my clothes. I had torn my chillies, 499 00:35:20.039 --> 00:35:22.480 so I'm like on the floor in a hot closet, have my AC turned 500 00:35:22.519 --> 00:35:28.519 off because I wanted to sound okay. I'm thinking about the fact that I 501 00:35:28.559 --> 00:35:31.840 was using Skype, I needed to buy a special call recorder. I had 502 00:35:31.880 --> 00:35:37.920 to then edit and garage band and I you had to use like Libson for 503 00:35:38.079 --> 00:35:43.599 hosting and you had to figure out how to get the right code over to 504 00:35:43.679 --> 00:35:50.440 apple to post the podcast. The amount of complication and how high the Bar 505 00:35:50.480 --> 00:35:55.559 of entry was six years ago. Verse now drastically different. It you could 506 00:35:55.599 --> 00:36:05.920 do so much with essentially just riverside. I haven't looked that much into anchor 507 00:36:05.920 --> 00:36:08.199 and I the way it started verse. What it is now is actually quite 508 00:36:08.239 --> 00:36:13.559 different. But you look at an integration like this and you just go it's 509 00:36:13.599 --> 00:36:20.320 getting simple, which is really awesome in a number of ways, because you 510 00:36:20.400 --> 00:36:22.639 want this to be simple. But also how are we going to differentiate? 511 00:36:22.679 --> 00:36:27.159 And that becomes a big time question as more and more shows are like hey, 512 00:36:27.199 --> 00:36:30.800 it's easy, we should just start a podcast. Has Been around even 513 00:36:30.840 --> 00:36:36.000 before twitter. In fact, if you've read that twitter origin story, twitter 514 00:36:36.079 --> 00:36:40.320 started as a podcasting company first, and I they had a different name and 515 00:36:40.360 --> 00:36:45.679 I can't remember what it was. It was like Podeo or podium, I 516 00:36:45.719 --> 00:36:47.519 think that's one of those. Are An actual company now, but maybe someone 517 00:36:47.599 --> 00:36:51.800 just takes us back to them. Then they created a tool that became twitter 518 00:36:51.880 --> 00:36:54.760 and then they launched, they pivoted and launched that. So podcasting's been around 519 00:36:54.840 --> 00:36:59.960 forever. Yeah, Internet Age, it's that's the old concept. I remember 520 00:36:59.960 --> 00:37:02.800 listening to my first podcast and when I had my first IPOD, like most 521 00:37:02.800 --> 00:37:07.920 people, in like two thousand and six. It's been along two thousand and 522 00:37:07.920 --> 00:37:10.920 seven. Maybe it's been a long time, but it's always been hard, 523 00:37:12.000 --> 00:37:15.960 just like you said, to get all the things done in order to produce 524 00:37:15.119 --> 00:37:19.360 one podcast. I didn't get into the game until two thousand and nineteen. 525 00:37:19.440 --> 00:37:22.000 Actually was a customer, a sweet fish first and they helped me launch my 526 00:37:22.000 --> 00:37:24.679 podcast and then, I think in the process of doing it I learned how 527 00:37:24.679 --> 00:37:28.800 to do it. Now I could launch them multiple podcasts in a day, 528 00:37:28.840 --> 00:37:30.719 but I didn't always know how to do a blogging was popular, every other 529 00:37:30.760 --> 00:37:34.880 medium was popular. Now I think podcasting has been on the rise because it's 530 00:37:34.880 --> 00:37:38.719 been easier to do slowly, it's been easier to record and anchor. Anchor 531 00:37:38.760 --> 00:37:43.440 actually had a huge breakthrough. Anchor got became popular one because it was free, 532 00:37:43.440 --> 00:37:45.440 but too because you could record it straight on your phone exact and then 533 00:37:45.440 --> 00:37:50.079 push published, probably the easiest way. If you're just doing solo podcast. 534 00:37:50.159 --> 00:37:52.960 This is already been possible through one APP, but it's never been possible to 535 00:37:52.960 --> 00:37:57.920 do a guest space show with just a click button and Bam. And the 536 00:37:58.000 --> 00:38:01.639 quality is a big component of this. I think when people thought of anchor, 537 00:38:01.840 --> 00:38:07.519 originally you're thinking, okay, sweet, people can do this, but 538 00:38:07.559 --> 00:38:10.400 you're literally recording in your living room through your phone. The quality isn't quite 539 00:38:10.400 --> 00:38:15.320 there and you can still tell with some shows that are doing this route. 540 00:38:15.559 --> 00:38:20.000 It's not produced like enough to feel like this is the best. This is 541 00:38:20.039 --> 00:38:22.519 a great option. It's just that there's a low bar for entry. But 542 00:38:22.719 --> 00:38:28.239 with this, the better that the tools get, when you can go from 543 00:38:28.280 --> 00:38:32.159 a live intro all through riverside, you could go in and trim it, 544 00:38:32.280 --> 00:38:37.360 get it all like pretty essentially, and then you, and we'll talk about 545 00:38:37.360 --> 00:38:38.719 this in a minute, but like the video, could just go straight to 546 00:38:38.840 --> 00:38:44.400 spotify, which spotify seems really be getting into that idea of video podcasting. 547 00:38:44.679 --> 00:38:49.800 There's just a lot there that you're going. This has been simplified in a 548 00:38:49.840 --> 00:38:54.920 massive way and if we can keep the production value high while making it really 549 00:38:55.039 --> 00:39:00.239 easy for people, it's the way forward. Absolutely. Again, my question 550 00:39:00.320 --> 00:39:05.800 becomes how are you going to differentiate then? In how are you going to 551 00:39:05.840 --> 00:39:10.840 be, I would say, a good enough host to keep people's use a 552 00:39:10.840 --> 00:39:16.119 word. Dan Loves attention, because that's ultimately what this is. It's what 553 00:39:16.199 --> 00:39:21.440 radio was all those years ago, but now it's instead of turning a dial, 554 00:39:21.519 --> 00:39:25.360 and they have endless our ears have endless opportunity to for different types of 555 00:39:25.360 --> 00:39:30.119 audio engagement. There's so many options and it's getting simpler and simpler for more 556 00:39:30.159 --> 00:39:36.280 people to join, and that is the reason for this news headline, is 557 00:39:36.320 --> 00:39:39.960 that it's a big deal because it's going to like you think podcasting saturated? 558 00:39:40.039 --> 00:39:44.559 Now, not even close, like we're probably have a few million podcasts. 559 00:39:44.599 --> 00:39:47.519 Remember there's thirty million youtube channels, but we're going to get to thirty million 560 00:39:47.599 --> 00:39:52.920 podcast so now it's still early time to get out there and figure it out 561 00:39:52.960 --> 00:39:54.079 and learn how to do it. It's also a time for those who are 562 00:39:54.119 --> 00:39:59.440 currently into game to level up their podcast in order to stay competitive, because 563 00:39:59.480 --> 00:40:01.199 the tech is go going to make it easier and easier to get out there. 564 00:40:01.320 --> 00:40:06.079 Remember when blogging was like this? You it was. There was a 565 00:40:06.119 --> 00:40:10.760 few bloggers that everyone followed, and then sites like Tumblr or even word press 566 00:40:10.800 --> 00:40:14.639 there's all these okay, now we have a template, you can build your 567 00:40:14.679 --> 00:40:19.639 own blog. Market gets absolutely flooded and now people are going, okay, 568 00:40:19.679 --> 00:40:22.920 what's the next medium? The next medium is podcasting. That movement. You 569 00:40:22.960 --> 00:40:27.159 can't even be an early adopt anymore. That ship is saled. But where 570 00:40:27.199 --> 00:40:31.280 we are right now is okay. Now every one can have a podcast and 571 00:40:31.440 --> 00:40:36.000 there will still be podcasts that succeed that haven't been created yet, but they're 572 00:40:36.000 --> 00:40:39.039 going to differentiate in ways and they're going to be thinking through how they make 573 00:40:39.039 --> 00:40:45.159 content in much different ways than what it's been so far and how you gained 574 00:40:45.159 --> 00:40:49.000 an audience so far. What I love it is there's so many ways to 575 00:40:49.000 --> 00:40:51.880 win, and that's probably another topic for another time. I what are those 576 00:40:51.920 --> 00:40:54.719 ways to win when it's so easy just to get start, purely started, 577 00:40:54.960 --> 00:40:58.280 but to jump into the next topic, and this was part of the same 578 00:40:58.280 --> 00:41:04.440 announcement, was that spotify now supports video podcast which it's interestingly, I took 579 00:41:04.480 --> 00:41:07.960 a dive like just a few months ago because I noticed video podcast were on 580 00:41:07.000 --> 00:41:10.639 the rise. Everyone's a lot of people are listening to podcasts on Youtube and 581 00:41:10.719 --> 00:41:14.360 not even necessarily watching it, but they have it pulled up on Youtube and 582 00:41:14.360 --> 00:41:16.239 they're on a different tab or something, listening and video. I noticed more 583 00:41:16.280 --> 00:41:20.360 and more people get into video. Makes Makes Sense. It's some people like 584 00:41:20.440 --> 00:41:22.719 to watch, some people like to listen. I'm like, Gay, let's 585 00:41:22.760 --> 00:41:24.800 do both. RARETY recording. Let's get video footage and make it a podcast, 586 00:41:24.840 --> 00:41:27.880 make it a video. But I did a search and it was wicked 587 00:41:27.960 --> 00:41:30.920 hard. I'm like, wait, how do you distribute a video podcast? 588 00:41:30.039 --> 00:41:35.000 You can't go do it through Youtube and I look through like a dozen or 589 00:41:35.000 --> 00:41:37.880 two different hosts and none of them supported video. So I never spent enough 590 00:41:37.880 --> 00:41:40.559 time to figure out, like who like of the people doing video? How 591 00:41:40.559 --> 00:41:45.400 are they getting their video feeds to apple and spotify? But now anchor actually 592 00:41:45.400 --> 00:41:47.880 supports video and that's part of the riverside integration. You rerecorn cord high quality 593 00:41:47.920 --> 00:41:52.400 video on Riverside, push directly to anchor and I'm sure many podcast host will 594 00:41:52.400 --> 00:41:57.559 follow. There's one caveat, and freaking hate spotify for this, but the 595 00:41:57.639 --> 00:42:01.960 video only works on spotify. MMM, of course, freaking spotify. Are 596 00:42:02.000 --> 00:42:07.280 you in the Apple Podcast Guy? I am. I'm a spotify podcast guy. 597 00:42:07.880 --> 00:42:12.760 So I love this. I absolutely love this. I don't and I 598 00:42:12.880 --> 00:42:15.360 was going to pose this question at you, Dan. Do you tend to 599 00:42:15.440 --> 00:42:21.400 watch podcast does it matter on the topic, like when are you engaging video 600 00:42:21.440 --> 00:42:24.320 in a podcast format? That's funny. I don't watch podcasts, but I 601 00:42:24.400 --> 00:42:29.880 listen. I watch a lot of people on Youtube who all the lot of 602 00:42:29.880 --> 00:42:35.000 which their content could easily be on audio only. Yep, so I listened 603 00:42:35.079 --> 00:42:38.280 to essentially what could be podcasts a lot on youtube. I like been Alex 604 00:42:38.360 --> 00:42:42.400 Hermosi primary I have his podcast to and I listen to it, but I'm 605 00:42:42.400 --> 00:42:46.239 primarily consuming it by a Youtube Benjamin. I consume him on Tick Tockic. 606 00:42:46.519 --> 00:42:51.159 There's a number of people that I'm just I'm listening to on Youtube and it's 607 00:42:51.199 --> 00:42:53.679 mostly because they don't have a podcast. I would probably like some of them 608 00:42:53.679 --> 00:42:58.599 if I knew they were distributing on podcast. It's more convenient way to listen 609 00:42:58.679 --> 00:43:01.079 because of the way podcast get cued up and you can download it automatically and 610 00:43:01.119 --> 00:43:07.920 then on download it when you finished it. It just makes sense. Yeah, 611 00:43:07.119 --> 00:43:12.599 I don't watch podcasts. I do I agree with what you said. 612 00:43:12.639 --> 00:43:15.519 A lot of the content I'm consuming on Youtube tends to be in the realm 613 00:43:15.559 --> 00:43:21.880 of what something I could have consumed in a podcast format, but podcasting for 614 00:43:21.920 --> 00:43:24.840 me is so easy to take with you. This is why I like video 615 00:43:24.920 --> 00:43:29.639 specific I can't speak for apple, but the way that it works on spotify 616 00:43:29.639 --> 00:43:32.880 sacifically that when I play it, if it's up on my full screen, 617 00:43:32.920 --> 00:43:37.039 the video showing, but it's so seamless that as soon as that's gone, 618 00:43:37.079 --> 00:43:43.000 it's just audio and so the back in the fourth closing of my phone doesn't 619 00:43:43.039 --> 00:43:49.639 pause it. There's no it's extremely seamless through spotify and so I appreciate that. 620 00:43:49.800 --> 00:43:52.159 But even with the show, like I know Rogan, he was like 621 00:43:52.199 --> 00:43:58.199 the first to do video through spotify and it's fun like to be able to 622 00:43:58.199 --> 00:44:00.800 see the studio, but other than that, at the beginning of the show 623 00:44:00.840 --> 00:44:04.480 I'm not watching it. I'm it's just not and they're cutting that and they're 624 00:44:04.480 --> 00:44:07.920 putting it on ticktock and they're putting it on youtube and I enjoyed those clips 625 00:44:08.000 --> 00:44:12.760 over there, and that's where I do think there's a value add for podcasters. 626 00:44:12.880 --> 00:44:15.800 Is You mind as well? We're already here at dance. Might as 627 00:44:15.800 --> 00:44:19.599 well get the video. You might as well you do something like this because 628 00:44:19.679 --> 00:44:23.000 it's available to you and now you have this long form video content that can 629 00:44:23.039 --> 00:44:28.199 be used elsewhere in splices. But I don't imagine that most people are consuming 630 00:44:28.280 --> 00:44:35.119 this by just going to youtube consistence. Those that are in the podcast frame 631 00:44:35.159 --> 00:44:38.320 of mind I say, but it's just a it's an interesting play and again 632 00:44:38.360 --> 00:44:44.519 how simple it is, and then you add video it's fun time to be 633 00:44:44.559 --> 00:44:46.719 a podcaster. I think if you're in podcasting you should start thinking about how 634 00:44:46.719 --> 00:44:50.639 to add video, not just so you can get an extra distribution channel through 635 00:44:50.679 --> 00:44:55.280 youtube, but I think as more podcasting platform support video viewing, I think 636 00:44:55.280 --> 00:44:59.800 it'll just be like you can add in visual elements when you need to. 637 00:45:00.079 --> 00:45:01.679 Most of the time you could just talk about somes, but sometimes the pictures 638 00:45:01.719 --> 00:45:05.239 worth a thousand words. And what if he were reviewing an audio something? 639 00:45:05.239 --> 00:45:07.760 That's then you have to describe it. It doesn't quite do it justice. 640 00:45:07.800 --> 00:45:08.880 And if it's easy for me to just pull it up and take a look 641 00:45:08.880 --> 00:45:14.239 at what you're talking about real quick because I'm on a run or something and 642 00:45:14.280 --> 00:45:15.920 sometimes I just have it open on my phone as I'm doing dishes. I 643 00:45:15.960 --> 00:45:20.159 glanced at every once in a while to see the reaction that they're giving, 644 00:45:20.199 --> 00:45:23.159 because something drumatic happened if it's Joe Roguin or something. Yeah, but I 645 00:45:23.159 --> 00:45:27.440 think it's going in that direction and I would start focusing on a video game, 646 00:45:28.199 --> 00:45:30.800 even if only just for Youtube, because Youtube is taking over more and 647 00:45:30.840 --> 00:45:35.719 more podcasting and it's the date as really starting to go in that direction. 648 00:45:35.760 --> 00:45:39.400 The more that ticktock rises, the more that having the video does matter, 649 00:45:39.400 --> 00:45:43.599 which you and I have had this kind of like conversation, debate and Bet 650 00:45:43.639 --> 00:45:50.480 AB podcasting specifically, where it does the video from your podcast work. We 651 00:45:50.519 --> 00:45:53.519 don't need to rehash all of that, but I do think it's interesting. 652 00:45:53.599 --> 00:45:57.440 If you can have the video, not only is it good on Youtube, 653 00:45:57.440 --> 00:46:00.800 but tick tock is what a lot of people are thinking about as well as 654 00:46:00.880 --> 00:46:04.800 for us. She's really short form video content that then you can repurpose. 655 00:46:07.519 --> 00:46:12.400 Next in the news is an article that came from the morning brew about the 656 00:46:12.440 --> 00:46:20.280 perfect length for a podcast placement add so they had some conclusions in the article, 657 00:46:20.360 --> 00:46:22.199 but I wanted to ask throat to you, Benji, like how long 658 00:46:22.360 --> 00:46:25.119 is too long, or do you find that it has to be a certain 659 00:46:25.199 --> 00:46:30.280 length for you to even remember that there was an ad there? I am 660 00:46:30.400 --> 00:46:34.920 the guy that, when the ad comes on, I'm hitting fifteen second forward 661 00:46:34.920 --> 00:46:37.599 consistently, like I know the podcast that I listen to the most, I 662 00:46:37.639 --> 00:46:43.039 know where your ads are placed and I'm skipping them all the time. So 663 00:46:43.199 --> 00:46:47.400 to me, what I found interesting about this article is they to go long, 664 00:46:47.400 --> 00:46:53.480 go over a minute and whenever possible, that you find that you can 665 00:46:53.519 --> 00:47:00.119 get impact from length, which I'm like, okay, it's a little I 666 00:47:00.119 --> 00:47:02.039 don't know how people are engaging with that if they're just once they're playing a 667 00:47:02.079 --> 00:47:06.079 podcast, they forget about and they don't skip and then you're a minute in 668 00:47:06.159 --> 00:47:14.159 and you've had am this long ad listened to. Personally, I think the 669 00:47:14.199 --> 00:47:16.239 best way forward, and they mentioned this at the end of the article, 670 00:47:16.239 --> 00:47:22.239 so I'll just read it here, is to do a sponsored branded segment. 671 00:47:22.320 --> 00:47:27.239 So they say it's worth noting that these formats aren't the only options. Advertisers 672 00:47:27.239 --> 00:47:31.679 can run branded SAG segments, sponsor entire episodes or shows or even start podcasts 673 00:47:31.719 --> 00:47:37.800 of their own. And they talk about how macy's ran almost a ten minute 674 00:47:37.840 --> 00:47:43.079 branded segment on a show and it was listened like seventy seven percent listen through 675 00:47:43.199 --> 00:47:46.480 rate. Okay, the idea is to me. I I listen to a 676 00:47:46.519 --> 00:47:52.519 podcast, these fantasy football guys and they have a second show for when football 677 00:47:52.519 --> 00:47:59.559 season isn't happening called a spit ballers, and head and shoulders shampoo sponsors their 678 00:47:59.639 --> 00:48:04.199 show and the only they're one of the only advertisers I can remember, because 679 00:48:04.320 --> 00:48:09.480 they sponsor a specific recurring segment weekly, and so the hosts are doing at 680 00:48:09.719 --> 00:48:15.719 essentially like a ten second, almost a one sentence add read at the top 681 00:48:15.760 --> 00:48:22.239 and the segment is branded around the shampoo and something about what the shampoo does, 682 00:48:22.239 --> 00:48:23.880 and then they get to read the exact same sentence at the end of 683 00:48:23.920 --> 00:48:28.400 the segment. But the content in the Filler I still want to hear and 684 00:48:28.440 --> 00:48:35.239 consume. So it's almost like thinking about TV and thinking about in sports how 685 00:48:35.239 --> 00:48:40.559 different segments are or different parts of the entire broadcast are sponsored by companies. 686 00:48:42.519 --> 00:48:45.800 You can do that in podcasting and I think you'll see some pretty great results. 687 00:48:45.800 --> 00:48:49.639 It's also the same as like a mid roll ad, and mid roll 688 00:48:49.719 --> 00:48:53.559 ads tend to be the the best performing if you look at the stats. 689 00:48:53.559 --> 00:48:58.199 Pre Roll is potentially great, but mid roll is like you're safe bet. 690 00:48:58.280 --> 00:49:01.079 So that's my initial thoughts, Dan. I don't know what you would add 691 00:49:01.079 --> 00:49:07.800 on that. I've purchased a number of things from host recommendations. Nice, 692 00:49:07.800 --> 00:49:09.920 but it has to come directly from the host exactly. If the host is 693 00:49:09.960 --> 00:49:13.000 the line of that, I trust. Then I listened to and they're like, 694 00:49:13.360 --> 00:49:15.800 Oh, and for today sponsor is. I use them all the time. 695 00:49:15.880 --> 00:49:17.480 They're freaking fantastic. In fact, I just used it the other day 696 00:49:17.639 --> 00:49:21.239 and well, my kid did. This happened and it was it would work 697 00:49:21.320 --> 00:49:22.880 like a charm. Why are you waiting? Go and do it? I'm 698 00:49:22.920 --> 00:49:27.920 like those ones freaking get me, especially if I'm like they literally can't tip 699 00:49:27.960 --> 00:49:30.360 me over, and they have multiple times. But if it's not a host 700 00:49:30.360 --> 00:49:32.679 read ad, I'm done and it. But I get really mad if it's, 701 00:49:32.760 --> 00:49:37.119 if it's more than thirty seconds, I'm just like then I am searching 702 00:49:37.159 --> 00:49:39.440 for the skip button. I can tolerate it for about thirty seconds Max. 703 00:49:40.880 --> 00:49:45.199 So the longer brand plays, but really, if you're going ten minutes, 704 00:49:45.239 --> 00:49:49.920 it's like a branded content kind of a thing and it's just different exactly. 705 00:49:49.960 --> 00:49:52.880 There's a way to talk to you that I think. But I think thirty 706 00:49:52.920 --> 00:49:55.719 seconds is what I respect, even if it's has to happen multiple times, 707 00:49:55.719 --> 00:49:59.159 because they're a big show. And they're trying to monetize and they have a 708 00:49:59.159 --> 00:50:01.920 pre amid, maybe a couple meads if it's a really long show, and 709 00:50:01.960 --> 00:50:07.599 then a post. I'm like, I get it, but I'm on spotify. 710 00:50:07.880 --> 00:50:10.639 Tim Ferris has because he outeloads like the first five to six minutes of 711 00:50:10.639 --> 00:50:15.320 his podcast with ads, and so naturally I've just learned to skip the first 712 00:50:15.360 --> 00:50:19.239 five minutes. Yep, Yep. On spotify, the way they do adds 713 00:50:19.440 --> 00:50:22.440 is so, for instance, Bill Simmons, he on the front end of 714 00:50:22.480 --> 00:50:28.000 his show when his ads run. It's puts up the ad on your screen 715 00:50:28.079 --> 00:50:30.519 and you can tap it to go to the website. What's interesting about that 716 00:50:30.639 --> 00:50:34.519 is it's great for the advertiser in the fact like they get to put an 717 00:50:34.559 --> 00:50:37.519 image in front of the listener that they can tap on and go to a 718 00:50:37.519 --> 00:50:40.960 website. But what's counterintuitive is, let's say it's a thirty second add and 719 00:50:42.000 --> 00:50:45.039 this is just my brain, who doesn't like advertising really. So I'm going 720 00:50:45.079 --> 00:50:49.360 I know it's to fifteen skip, fifteen second skips, and I also know 721 00:50:49.639 --> 00:50:55.559 that it's going to take me out essentially of the typical podcast like linear line. 722 00:50:55.599 --> 00:51:00.599 So if I skip this, it changes the album are in a sense 723 00:51:00.679 --> 00:51:02.880 to the ad and I know exactly how far I need to skip because then 724 00:51:02.920 --> 00:51:07.880 that's gone. It takes me back to Bill Simmons logo. So you just 725 00:51:07.320 --> 00:51:14.559 it's you have to be thinking about being the listener there. There for the 726 00:51:14.599 --> 00:51:17.800 content, and podcasting is different than like TV, where I go to TV 727 00:51:19.000 --> 00:51:22.800 knowing that ads are part of the equation. When I come to podcasting I 728 00:51:22.840 --> 00:51:27.199 know I can skip. So if I can really get baked into the show 729 00:51:27.199 --> 00:51:31.920 by being a branded segment that I know the listeners will still engage with that 730 00:51:32.000 --> 00:51:35.920 segment and my name is being going back to what you said, Dan, 731 00:51:36.039 --> 00:51:39.480 it's mentioned multiple times. That to me seems like gold, like why wouldn't 732 00:51:39.519 --> 00:51:44.320 you want to be that where people are like, I actually really enjoy that 733 00:51:44.320 --> 00:51:50.000 segment. Oh Yeah, and it's sponsored by head and shoulders. So, 734 00:51:50.280 --> 00:51:53.639 BDB podcast, you should probably be running ads. I think it really helps 735 00:51:53.639 --> 00:51:58.400 your show, especially if you do an artful and tasteful why you're working with 736 00:51:58.800 --> 00:52:02.039 people that you actually work with like you're their customers and you could say hey, 737 00:52:02.039 --> 00:52:05.880 it, we work for a company and we use this all the time. 738 00:52:05.920 --> 00:52:07.960 It's fantastic. Check it out. If you have relevant things it only 739 00:52:08.000 --> 00:52:12.880 makes the show better if you're doing in a tasteful way. If you think 740 00:52:12.880 --> 00:52:16.559 about it, youtubers may call channels doing nothing but product reviews and it's entertaining. 741 00:52:16.639 --> 00:52:19.840 Why? Because people want to know about the new stuff, they want 742 00:52:19.880 --> 00:52:22.760 to know about ways they can be helped. People actually like getting ads if 743 00:52:22.760 --> 00:52:30.440 the ads done in a way that's most helpful to the audience. So moving 744 00:52:30.519 --> 00:52:34.599 on, we have the member highlight for the week and that is from a 745 00:52:34.679 --> 00:52:39.679 podcast called raising problem solvers and it is from the art of problem solvingcom. 746 00:52:39.719 --> 00:52:45.199 Now they're trying to reach parents of gift, not gifted, but kids that 747 00:52:45.199 --> 00:52:49.000 are trying to like really push their MAS skills. But they're also going to 748 00:52:49.159 --> 00:52:52.800 be to be to educators and different be to be context. So it's almost 749 00:52:52.800 --> 00:52:57.199 like a consumer podcast. It's mixed B Tocbdb Blay. But he does something 750 00:52:57.239 --> 00:53:00.320 in the podcast that I loved. Eric is the host of the show and 751 00:53:00.360 --> 00:53:05.400 he brings his daughter onto every episode in the very beginnings and he asked her 752 00:53:05.440 --> 00:53:08.239 a really basic question. That's the premise, the topic for the show. 753 00:53:08.599 --> 00:53:12.880 He's a sweetheart. Tell me, what do you think about this? And 754 00:53:12.920 --> 00:53:15.360 then she gets on the microphone and gives an answer and she's probably going to 755 00:53:15.440 --> 00:53:20.519 be like seven or eight years old or something, and her answers are always 756 00:53:20.519 --> 00:53:22.719 really interesting and it sets up the conversation for the show in a way that 757 00:53:22.800 --> 00:53:28.320 just is really sweet but at the same time really sets the tone for the 758 00:53:28.320 --> 00:53:32.440 conversation, because then eric takes over and gives a narration for the conversation after 759 00:53:32.440 --> 00:53:36.239 her answer, and I just thought it was a really interesting way thing that 760 00:53:36.280 --> 00:53:38.360 he did with his podcast that I think one you should check out and think 761 00:53:38.360 --> 00:53:42.239 about how you might be able to change up the intro of your podcast. 762 00:53:42.320 --> 00:53:45.159 We're going to be talking about intro a little bit later on in mic club 763 00:53:45.199 --> 00:53:51.440 as we are developing our own thinking on intros. But think about how you 764 00:53:51.480 --> 00:53:54.800 can lead into your intro in a slightly different way, maybe with different pieces 765 00:53:54.800 --> 00:54:00.559 from different people, the customers, the consumers behind your customers. Where can 766 00:54:00.599 --> 00:54:04.880 you break in other voices that might be able to lead into your intro? 767 00:54:04.960 --> 00:54:07.159 So check out raising problem solvers, the PODCAST I'll link it to in a 768 00:54:07.199 --> 00:54:13.440 show notes really interesting way to start a podcast. Moving on to the question 769 00:54:13.519 --> 00:54:16.519 segment, we have two main questions that we're going into, starting with how 770 00:54:16.559 --> 00:54:21.599 can I become a guest on other people shows is a frequent question I hear 771 00:54:21.719 --> 00:54:27.400 from be Tob podcasters. Any thoughts on that? Benjie? I would immediately 772 00:54:27.400 --> 00:54:30.000 throw back to you because I know this is something you're thinking about right now 773 00:54:30.039 --> 00:54:34.000 and I've been pitched, so we can talk about that. But I'd like 774 00:54:34.320 --> 00:54:38.920 your perspective first. Now, I've been in your seat before, where I 775 00:54:38.960 --> 00:54:43.880 was hosting a lot of bb growth episodes, and it seems like you frequently 776 00:54:43.960 --> 00:54:49.199 get pitches and ninety nine percent of them you're like, not only do you 777 00:54:49.239 --> 00:54:52.880 say no, but you like you think negatively of that person. Yeah, 778 00:54:52.880 --> 00:54:57.000 you're frustrate. You like they went down a few points in your book, 779 00:54:57.320 --> 00:55:00.880 mostly because you've never seen them before. So your first interaction is, Hey, 780 00:55:00.920 --> 00:55:04.719 saw that you run a podcast. I think I would be great for 781 00:55:04.760 --> 00:55:08.159 your audience. Here's my qualifications. I would talk about this. What do 782 00:55:08.199 --> 00:55:12.559 you think? They're pitching it to you as if it's a value to you, 783 00:55:12.599 --> 00:55:16.079 as if they're like God's gift to your podcast, and you're like no, 784 00:55:16.719 --> 00:55:21.440 every once in a while somebody gets really lucky and it's just because I 785 00:55:21.519 --> 00:55:25.360 happen to be covering that topic soon and I'm looking for people on it, 786 00:55:25.400 --> 00:55:29.599 but it's rare, super rare. So I can say a few things that 787 00:55:29.639 --> 00:55:31.800 have gone well for me for pitching other people, but generally this is the 788 00:55:31.840 --> 00:55:37.119 best practice. In fact, there's a there's a another agency we work with 789 00:55:37.199 --> 00:55:39.239 often to refer people to on how to get on podcast. It's called speak 790 00:55:39.280 --> 00:55:43.800 on podcastscom. They're great at this, so you can hire someone to do 791 00:55:43.840 --> 00:55:46.519 this for you, but generally the best thing you could do is actually build 792 00:55:46.519 --> 00:55:50.559 a bit of a relationship with the host and then find out what their agenda 793 00:55:50.639 --> 00:55:53.880 is for the podcast and then reverse engineer what you can speak to to meet 794 00:55:53.920 --> 00:55:57.800 that agenda. But it takes a Freakin ton of time, which is why 795 00:55:57.920 --> 00:56:00.840 people hire people like speak on podcast in order to help them do it, 796 00:56:00.679 --> 00:56:02.079 and it's not cheap because of the amount of time it takes to build a 797 00:56:02.119 --> 00:56:06.880 relationship. But it is possible, and that's probably the best way that I've 798 00:56:06.920 --> 00:56:12.000 seen, is to find the host, find them what act, whatever social 799 00:56:12.039 --> 00:56:15.920 platform they're currently on, build a relationship by getting conversations, going to talk 800 00:56:16.000 --> 00:56:22.079 about what they're posting about and then listen to some episodes and then you can 801 00:56:22.079 --> 00:56:24.519 make a pitch to be on their show, especially if you have a different 802 00:56:24.559 --> 00:56:29.199 angle to what they're currently talking about or know what their next things about being 803 00:56:29.239 --> 00:56:31.599 able to recommend yourself in. There is a possible way to do it. 804 00:56:31.639 --> 00:56:37.760 That's probably the least will lead to the highest amount of success, especially if 805 00:56:37.800 --> 00:56:42.280 it's not as like a mega show like Gary V. you'll never be on 806 00:56:42.360 --> 00:56:45.000 because it's just too hard to get on. You have to be a celebrity 807 00:56:45.039 --> 00:56:47.119 already. But there's plenty of other shows, especially to be to be context 808 00:56:47.119 --> 00:56:50.880 that will gladly take you if you are at the right place at the right 809 00:56:50.880 --> 00:56:54.320 time. Yeah, that's a big component of this to me, is if 810 00:56:54.360 --> 00:56:59.760 you come in guns blazing. This is why I'm God's gift to your podcast. 811 00:57:00.920 --> 00:57:06.719 It just doesn't it lacks the tone necessary to land you on a show. 812 00:57:06.880 --> 00:57:13.000 Versus if you could come in, and I'm not talking about crappy personalization 813 00:57:13.119 --> 00:57:17.360 where like you personalize the first sentence and happen to mention the name of the 814 00:57:17.360 --> 00:57:21.440 show and what one of the titles of the last few episodes, where that 815 00:57:21.519 --> 00:57:23.440 is not what I'm talking about here, but if you were to like deeply 816 00:57:23.519 --> 00:57:30.639 listen to a few and prove that out, or comment on the publishing of 817 00:57:30.639 --> 00:57:34.039 a few episodes go and tell me what you liked. There's a way to 818 00:57:34.079 --> 00:57:36.800 do that. If you're going to come in cold, you might as well 819 00:57:36.880 --> 00:57:44.719 come in cold completely and like come go into the email and allow your introduction 820 00:57:45.239 --> 00:57:50.480 to explain why you're pitching podcasts. Why are you like, just very briefly, 821 00:57:50.519 --> 00:57:52.639 I'm reaching out to a few podcast because recently I did this thing that 822 00:57:52.679 --> 00:57:55.320 I think could be a value to your audience, because I know that they 823 00:57:55.360 --> 00:58:00.679 do blank. That's better to me than the half baked personalization. But I 824 00:58:00.719 --> 00:58:05.800 do think having relationship, obviously always going to be optimal, is your best 825 00:58:05.840 --> 00:58:10.639 bet and then pitching shows that aren't in the top hundred, go further down 826 00:58:10.679 --> 00:58:15.559 the list, find some that maybe our prove you're worth on those shows and 827 00:58:15.599 --> 00:58:21.320 then you have some in your on your resume essentially, and hopefully those go 828 00:58:21.360 --> 00:58:27.280 well enough that then it allows that flywheel to start moving and gaining momentum. 829 00:58:27.360 --> 00:58:29.639 But I have said yes. I have said Yes to some pictures for me 830 00:58:29.679 --> 00:58:31.280 to be what I will say that, and most of them go one of 831 00:58:31.320 --> 00:58:36.239 the two ways. Either they know they're very hyper personalized or it wasn't at 832 00:58:36.280 --> 00:58:42.599 all, but they tell me why they're reaching out. Two shows ways to 833 00:58:42.599 --> 00:58:45.400 win. A few other like subquestions I get around this topic. Are The 834 00:58:45.440 --> 00:58:51.239 websites where you can swap shows worth it or essentially list yourself as a speaker 835 00:58:51.280 --> 00:58:53.719 and let the podcast list their podcast for incoming speakers. None of them are 836 00:58:53.800 --> 00:58:58.239 worth it. Let me just save you the time. Don't do it. 837 00:58:57.920 --> 00:59:00.119 It's not a great way to get on podcast. If those podcasts lets you 838 00:59:00.239 --> 00:59:04.840 on, they're probably trash with zero audience. And I never list our podcast 839 00:59:04.960 --> 00:59:08.360 on those sites because everybody going incoming is as just not I would never take 840 00:59:08.360 --> 00:59:12.960 them in as that's a guest. So just save yourself the time at least. 841 00:59:13.000 --> 00:59:15.519 Just do the relationship building. One. The gold standard that Chris Walker 842 00:59:15.599 --> 00:59:22.320 uses is to not ask anybody and just publish infra edge. Just be so 843 00:59:22.440 --> 00:59:25.920 active on a social media site like Linkedin, twitter, Youtube, something where 844 00:59:25.920 --> 00:59:30.280 you're posting amazing content that draws people to you. Anytime I've been a guest 845 00:59:30.320 --> 00:59:35.079 on the show it's because I've been asked. I've never actually pitched someone to 846 00:59:35.119 --> 00:59:37.679 be a guest on a podcast yet, though I'd like to, because, 847 00:59:37.679 --> 00:59:39.320 again, like everybody, it's great to be featured as a guest, but 848 00:59:40.239 --> 00:59:45.880 that's the easy that's the gold standard be so interesting and have something so good 849 00:59:45.960 --> 00:59:49.199 and so helpful that people are coming to you and being like, Oh, 850 00:59:49.239 --> 00:59:52.760 I'd love to interview about and I've chased after many authors and people that have 851 00:59:52.800 --> 00:59:55.599 something going, including Chris Wonger, to be on BDB growth and, if 852 00:59:55.679 --> 01:00:00.400 my own attention, podcast. So that's the best way to go. But 853 01:00:00.880 --> 01:00:02.960 again there's other things you can do in addition to that to get on more 854 01:00:02.960 --> 01:00:08.719 podcast I'm moving on to the second question. How much preparation research do you 855 01:00:08.800 --> 01:00:14.360 do leading up to recording a podcast episode with a guest? Was a recent 856 01:00:14.400 --> 01:00:16.159 topic in the MIC club group on linked in, which, if you're listening 857 01:00:16.159 --> 01:00:17.960 to this you're not part of that group, you need to go find it, 858 01:00:19.000 --> 01:00:23.280 but I'll make a short link at join mic clubcom linked in and it'll 859 01:00:23.280 --> 01:00:27.000 send you right to the group page to be in the group. But this 860 01:00:27.079 --> 01:00:30.280 question comes from there and this is interesting. So I think we talked about 861 01:00:30.280 --> 01:00:31.280 this and be a big growth, but not here on my club. So 862 01:00:31.320 --> 01:00:37.880 I'm mention how much preparation do you put into preparing? I will say only 863 01:00:37.920 --> 01:00:43.440 for me personally. I do not like this question if you're trying to give 864 01:00:43.440 --> 01:00:46.239 a blanket answer, because everyone's going to be different. I find it interesting 865 01:00:46.280 --> 01:00:52.079 sometimes people have the opinion that if they're more wellknown, you do more research. 866 01:00:52.880 --> 01:00:58.079 Sometimes that's just not too true, because you could listen to a couple 867 01:00:58.159 --> 01:01:01.800 PODCASTS, a couple content pieces that they've put out and you can find a 868 01:01:01.840 --> 01:01:05.360 section that you go oh, that's really good and I want to talk about 869 01:01:05.360 --> 01:01:07.639 that. You have endless options of what to talk to this person about because 870 01:01:07.719 --> 01:01:12.039 they've been featured. So do you want to make it unique in somehow stand 871 01:01:12.079 --> 01:01:15.280 out amongst the noise? Yeah, but I find you have so much content 872 01:01:15.360 --> 01:01:17.960 to choose from that you don't have to dig quite as hard. Versus if 873 01:01:19.000 --> 01:01:22.280 I'm having to really think through my questions because maybe this person hasn't been in 874 01:01:22.320 --> 01:01:27.880 the spotlight as often, I find myself prepping those questions more intentionally. I 875 01:01:27.880 --> 01:01:30.719 find myself hosting the pre interview and I usually go back and I listen to 876 01:01:30.760 --> 01:01:37.440 the pre interview again into speed and I'm taking notes and I'm rewinding more off 877 01:01:37.480 --> 01:01:40.480 and trying to understand what what they meant by something they said. And a 878 01:01:40.519 --> 01:01:44.800 lot of times they're not as trained in front of a camera or in front 879 01:01:44.800 --> 01:01:47.239 of a microphone, so they're more nervous thinking about it much differently. I 880 01:01:47.360 --> 01:01:52.960 also do interviews with authors, and authors know their content a majority of the 881 01:01:52.960 --> 01:01:58.760 time fairly well, and so in that experience they have a book that we're 882 01:01:58.840 --> 01:02:02.480 drawing from, which means preparation. I can almost predict my preparation for talking 883 01:02:02.480 --> 01:02:06.719 to an author is thirty to sixty minutes, because I'm going to take their 884 01:02:06.760 --> 01:02:09.239 concepts, I'm going to take their content, I'm going to use quotes like 885 01:02:09.320 --> 01:02:15.800 I can pull copy paste. That's a much different process than going okay, 886 01:02:15.840 --> 01:02:20.800 this person doesn't do anything publicly, but they're just a CMO for this company 887 01:02:20.800 --> 01:02:22.320 and it's fantastic to have you on the show, but I don't know what 888 01:02:22.400 --> 01:02:25.440 to pull from. So I might be looking at your website and so to 889 01:02:25.559 --> 01:02:30.440 me I don't want to go much above an hour just because I'm doing so 890 01:02:30.559 --> 01:02:37.559 many of these, but that would I would say it's a little bit different 891 01:02:37.559 --> 01:02:40.360 person to person and somewhere in that ballpark range. What about you, Dan? 892 01:02:43.159 --> 01:02:45.480 It's fun. I usually like to give a really precise answer rather than 893 01:02:45.559 --> 01:02:50.719 it depends, because it depends as never never a good answer. But just 894 01:02:50.760 --> 01:02:54.320 to illustrate that it's there's so many ways to win, and let's be thankful 895 01:02:54.360 --> 01:02:57.480 for it. That there's not just one right answer, and this could be 896 01:02:57.480 --> 01:03:00.360 a point of differentiation for your show. Whether you prepared not, that is 897 01:03:00.440 --> 01:03:02.840 like almost zero, or you prepare hours and hour is like ten hours into 898 01:03:02.880 --> 01:03:06.840 a show. To give the two extremes, you have Joe Rogan on one 899 01:03:06.920 --> 01:03:10.239 end, who prepares, but let's his long interviews unpack the most interesting points 900 01:03:10.239 --> 01:03:13.840 that he could then turn into small clips. If you want to see what 901 01:03:13.920 --> 01:03:16.360 that not like, letting less prepared what that looks like. And I'm sure 902 01:03:16.400 --> 01:03:20.679 he actually prepares some. I can't imagine he's coming off blind, but he 903 01:03:20.760 --> 01:03:24.280 uses a long interview in order to uncover the topics and gives it breathing space. 904 01:03:24.440 --> 01:03:27.599 Versus, on the other hand, you have sewn Evans of hot ones, 905 01:03:27.639 --> 01:03:32.559 who's fantastic asking well research questions. He's asking if celebrities that nobody else 906 01:03:32.599 --> 01:03:37.760 has asked them because he's done so much more homework than any other interviewer. 907 01:03:37.159 --> 01:03:40.599 Where you don't want we probably be, and there's I say, don't be 908 01:03:40.639 --> 01:03:44.440 in the middle, but there's even so many different, different ways to do 909 01:03:44.480 --> 01:03:46.559 it. Instead of doing research, you do a long pre interview to find 910 01:03:46.599 --> 01:03:50.480 the right topics and because of the angle of your show, you're going to 911 01:03:50.480 --> 01:03:52.280 be able to pull out something different than what everybody else is asking because, 912 01:03:52.480 --> 01:03:57.880 well, everybody's asking Chris Walker About de man Jin. Your show might be 913 01:03:57.920 --> 01:04:04.119 about customer experience for agencies. Bam, you think Kress has been asked a 914 01:04:04.119 --> 01:04:09.079 lot of about things about customer experience at an agency level and that that would 915 01:04:09.079 --> 01:04:13.559 be interesting right, because everybody's asking him about demand Jin over on his backstory, 916 01:04:13.599 --> 01:04:15.519 but not from that angle. So the angle of your show might be 917 01:04:15.559 --> 01:04:18.320 able to draw something interesting and you might not need a lot more time. 918 01:04:18.760 --> 01:04:21.920 You might actually use the same ten questions every time because you're the angle of 919 01:04:21.960 --> 01:04:24.840 your shows. So you unique. It's still get to be good. So 920 01:04:24.880 --> 01:04:28.480 there's so many ways to win. The question is, does your show sound 921 01:04:28.480 --> 01:04:32.400 like everybody else's? And that's a different problem. But know that how much 922 01:04:32.440 --> 01:04:36.920 you prepare could be one of the differentiating factors for your show. I love 923 01:04:38.000 --> 01:04:43.400 this about my club and about forming a community around be tob podcasting is that 924 01:04:43.480 --> 01:04:48.559 it should be more about what we're learning then telling you and prescribing to you 925 01:04:48.599 --> 01:04:53.760 the exact thing you should do. There is not a minute's limit. You 926 01:04:53.760 --> 01:04:58.320 should put on it. This isn't it depends answer. It's a cope. 927 01:04:58.360 --> 01:05:00.880 This is what a good coach would do, is they would ask some follow 928 01:05:00.960 --> 01:05:04.800 up questions that then facilitate you thinking about the show you're trying to create. 929 01:05:05.320 --> 01:05:09.400 Because, Dan, I like that phrase you use, that there's so many 930 01:05:09.400 --> 01:05:14.800 ways to win. In truth, it could be cool if you set a 931 01:05:14.800 --> 01:05:18.519 time limit for yourself and said I'm going in with whatever I can create in 932 01:05:18.599 --> 01:05:23.920 thirty minutes and you could tell people that this is just like, that's a 933 01:05:23.920 --> 01:05:29.440 way that I do my research, but to you it's really knowing your why 934 01:05:29.480 --> 01:05:34.239 and what you're centering a podcast around and allowing yourself there's also people that just 935 01:05:34.280 --> 01:05:40.079 do research way faster than me, pretty slow on the way that I do 936 01:05:40.159 --> 01:05:44.840 my research. So I need more time, not because I'm necessarily doing better 937 01:05:44.880 --> 01:05:49.320 research, but just because I get distracted. So that's a big component as 938 01:05:49.320 --> 01:05:54.320 well. Hopefully this show is giving you ideas of things you can go and 939 01:05:54.320 --> 01:05:57.800 test with your own podcast, because I don't believe, I don't believe in 940 01:05:57.800 --> 01:06:01.599 the idea of launching a perfect podcast. The best content channels and the channels 941 01:06:01.679 --> 01:06:06.360 that have the most success are usually ones that have evolved and had time to 942 01:06:06.400 --> 01:06:11.599 try out different things over time. I've I went and I'm still servying the 943 01:06:11.599 --> 01:06:17.199 top fifty marketing podcasts and they're all shows that have grown from something that used 944 01:06:17.239 --> 01:06:21.559 to be rough and have grown to be hit just the right have just the 945 01:06:21.599 --> 01:06:26.519 mind of right amount of resonance with their audience in the length and the host 946 01:06:26.679 --> 01:06:28.639 and the way they speak to and the way they speak to it at, 947 01:06:28.639 --> 01:06:30.679 the types of guests they pick. All of those things have been honed in 948 01:06:31.360 --> 01:06:35.039 because they've experimented and tried out different things. So hopefully, in covering the 949 01:06:35.079 --> 01:06:40.639 news, highlighting members and answering these questions with a variety of answers, there 950 01:06:40.719 --> 01:06:43.480 is something for you to take away from the podcast in order to try and 951 01:06:43.519 --> 01:06:49.199 make your podcast one that can be your audience's favorite show. So until next 952 01:06:49.199 --> 01:06:54.079 week we're going to sign off and again check us out on Linkedin. We 953 01:06:54.159 --> 01:06:58.280 just lunked the launch that linkedin group last week. So go to joint my 954 01:06:58.400 --> 01:07:00.840 CLUBCOM LINKED IN TO BE PARTY THROUGH